BT warns Ofcom of legal challenge ahead of ruling

first_img Show Comments ▼ whatsapp KCS-content whatsapp Tags: NULL Sharecenter_img BT warns Ofcom of legal challenge ahead of ruling Tuesday 16 November 2010 9:20 pm by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastMoneyPailShe Was Famous, Now She Works In {State}MoneyPailSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBlood Pressure Solution4 Worst Blood Pressure MedsBlood Pressure SolutionMagellan TimesThis Is Why The Roy Rogers Museum Has Been Closed For GoodMagellan TimesElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite HeraldOne-N-Done | 7-Minute Workout7 Minutes a Day To a Flat Stomach By Using This 1 Easy ExerciseOne-N-Done | 7-Minute WorkoutHealthyGem”My 600-lb Life” Star Dropped 420 Pounds, See Her NowHealthyGemDaily Finance StoriesChrissy Metz, 40, Shows Off Massive Weight Loss In Fierce New PhotoDaily Finance Stories Read This NextRicky Schroder Calls Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl ‘Ignorant Punk’ forThe WrapCNN’s Brian Stelter Draws Criticism for Asking Jen Psaki: ‘What Does theThe WrapDid Donald Trump Wear His Pants Backwards? Kriss Kross Memes Have AlreadyThe WrapHarvey Weinstein to Be Extradited to California to Face Sexual AssaultThe WrapPink Floyd’s Roger Waters Denies Zuckerberg’s Request to Use Song in Ad:The Wrap’The View’: Meghan McCain Calls VP Kamala Harris a ‘Moron’ for BorderThe Wrap’Sex and the City’ Sequel Series at HBO Max Adds 4 More ReturningThe WrapNewsmax Rejected Matt Gaetz When Congressman ‘Reached Out’ for a JobThe Wrap2 HFPA Members Resign Citing a Culture of ‘Corruption and Verbal Abuse’The Wrap TELECOMS giant BT has warned it could sue regulator Ofcom, after it refused to allow a rise in wholesale fees to rivals to help repair BT’s onerous pension deficit.An interim ruling in July by the regulator denied BT the opportunity to raise charges on its Openreach business, the subsidiary used by rivals to access BT’s network. If onfirmed in December by Ofcom, the operator could pursue a legal challenge.Companies in other sectors are allowed to raise wholesale charges to rivals in order to address pension deficits, including in the gas and electricity market.Worries over BT’s pension pot were raised by the Pensions Regulator in February over the company’s plans to remedy its deficit, which stood at £9bn, according to a December 2008 actuarial valuation. last_img read more

Fenner sees its profits rise

first_imgMonday 7 March 2011 8:49 pm Show Comments ▼ KCS-content Fenner sees its profits rise whatsapp Engineering firm Fenner yesterday said the “sharp increase in profitability” seen in the first-quarter had been maintained in its conveyor belting and advanced engineered products divisions in the second-quarter. In a pre-close trading statement the firm, based in Hessle, near Hull, said first half-trading was characterised by both volume and margin improvements across its principal business units with increasing benefits from capital investment programmes and improved trading conditions at the end of the second-quarter. Tags: NULL whatsapp Share More From Our Partners Brave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comlast_img read more

Uganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug) 2003 Annual Report

first_imgUganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug) listed on the Uganda Securities Exchange under the Building & Associated sector has released it’s 2003 annual report.For more information about Uganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Uganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Uganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug)  2003 annual report.Company ProfileUganda Clays Limited manufactures and markets clay products for the building and construction industry in Uganda. Its product offering ranges from roofing tiles, bricks and floor tiles to decorative grilles, ventilators, pipes and suspended floor units and partition blocks. The company supplies the local building trade in Uganda and exports products to Kenya, Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda, the DRC and South Sudan. Uganda Clays Limited was founded in 1950 and its head office is in Kampala, Uganda. Uganda Clays Limited is listed on the Uganda Securities Exchangelast_img read more

Water: Common good or commodity?

first_imgWater: Common good or commodity? Trinity Institute 2017 March 25, 2017 at 12:42 pm Why did I need to read to the bottom of an article from the Episcopal Church in order to find a theological statement? Water is first and foremost the creation of God which reveals to us the nature of God. Without this understanding there is no way to discuss any of the human questions of common good vs commodity. With this understanding it is clear that the commodification of water is one of the many social sins that plague us today. It is the church’s role to clearly point to God as Creator and to enable society to find a way of life which is according to God’s ways in Creation. If we look first to the social sciences and the dismal science of economics to define reality, we are lost before we begin. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal News Service] The demand for water is expected to increase 55 percent by 2030 and at the same time global water resources may only meet 60 percent of the world’s needs.“Africa, India, the Middle East and Australia already are in crisis,” said Maude Barlow, a former United Nations senior advisor on water, and an author, political activist and policy critic. Some say “the solution to the water crisis is to commodify water,” she added, during a March 23 session on “Waters: Commons or Commodity” during Water Justice,  a global conference taking place at Trinity Church Wall Street in New York City and webcast worldwide March 22-24.The Rev. Brandon Mauai, a deacon in the Diocese of North Dakota and member of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation, talked about the Episcopal Church’s support for the Standing Rock Sioux Nation as it and its allies fought against the route of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Photo: is Leo Sorel/Trinity Wall StreetThe conference aims to offer actionable guidance for individuals, congregations and the larger faith community surrounding the need for water justice initiatives in areas of access, droughts, pollution, rising tides and flooding. Water Justice is the 46th annual conference organized by the Trinity Institute, past conferences have addressed racial justice and economic inequality.If the Great Lakes, the largest surface freshwater system on Earth, “were pumped as mercilessly as ground water, they would be dry in 80 years,” Barlow warned. Russia’s Aral Sea, once the fourth-largest freshwater lake in the world, is now 10 percent its former size.  Half the waters in China, a water-rich country, have disappeared. Sao Paulo, the second largest city in the world, is drought-stricken because rapid destruction of the Amazon rainforest has decreased vapor clouds that used to carry water to central and south Brazil.All of this, Barlow said, is happening as corporations, governments and the World Bank, contemplate a global waters market, where water futures can be sold like oil and gas.“Is it [water] a human right, a public trust or a private asset?” asked Barlow.“We have to fiercely protect it everywhere as a commons,” she said. “Water shouldn’t be put into the market. That doesn’t mean the private sector doesn’t have a role. But the central question is who owns water itself, and who has access to it and who does not, and in places around the world now this is a life or death situation.”The United Nations says water is a human right, and Barlow was instrumental in moving the intergovernmental organization to make that determination. On July 28, 2010, the U.N. General Assembly recognized the human right to water and sanitation and acknowledged that access to both are “essential to the realization of all human rights.” The resolution passed with 122 nations in favor, zero against and 41 abstentions, including the United States and Canada. (Both the U.S. and Canada have since adopted the resolution.)Still, saying water is a human right doesn’t mean it’s protected or that everyone has access to it. As examples, Barlow mentioned Detroit and Baltimore, two cities that have turned off residents’ taps.In Detroit, a financially strapped, hollowed-out inner city, residents’ water rates tripled and many poor people couldn’t afford to pay their water bills; in Baltimore, city officials maintained it was necessary to have a system in which everyone paid pays “their fair share.”As Christiana Zenner Peppard, a professor at Fordham University a theologian and freshwater expert, pointed out in her response to Barlow’s talk, a human being can survive less than 7 days without water.“Water is not replaceable by any other thing; it is the baseline for human, ecological and the planetary system,” she said. “You cannot talk about water and justice as two separate things.”In terms of religious values and water ethics, “it’s foundational to life and understood as finite,” and at least from the Christian point of view, access to water is caring for “the least of these.”The Roman Catholic Church, she said, has been an advocate for water as a human right since the early aughts; in his encyclical on the environment, Pope Francis said that water shouldn’t be commodified.The world’s water crisis manifests in many ways, from rising waters, to drought, to waters polluted by toxins, to the proximity of a drinking water source. Following, Barlow’s talk and Peppard’s response, Trinity’s audience heard from three storytellers living on the frontlines of three different water crises.Three years after the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, residents continue to rely on bottled water for their drinking and hygienic needs, said Nakiya Wakes, an activist and spokesperson for Flint Rising, a coalition of community organizations preparing Flint residents for the long-haul.In April 2014, under the leadership of an emergency manager and to save $5 million, the city’s water supply was switched from Lake Huron via Detroit’s municipal water system to the Flint River, a more corrosive source. At the same time, the emergency manager, seeking to save $100 a day, ordered that the water not be treated with a chemical to prevent lead from leaching out of the city’s aging pipes into the water running through them and destined for residents. The state had, mistakenly, told Flint officials that federal guidelines did not require the chemical treatment, according to the New York Times.Almost immediately following the switch, residents began to complain about the water’s color, taste and smell, and the skin irritation caused by bathing in it, yet government officials maintained the water’s safety. It wasn’t until January 2016 that a federal state of emergency was declared and residents were told to use only bottled or filtered water for drinking or bathing.While still drinking tap water, Wakes miscarried twins, she said, and both her son and her daughter have elevated lead levels in their bodies; her daughter’s hair began falling out, her son has had behavioral problems, and both children had rashes on their bodies.“We have been lied to for too long and we don’t trust our government,” she said. “Three years later we are drinking bottled water … we don’t have access to clean water in the United States of America. They call Michigan “Pure Michigan” and we are being pure poisoned.”The Rev. Brandon Mauai, a deacon in the Diocese of North Dakota and a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation talked about the Episcopal Church’s support for the Standing Rock Sioux Nation as it and its allies fought against the route of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The 1,134-mile pipeline was originally routed near Bismarck, North Dakota, but changed after residents expressed concern an accident would contaminate the city’s drinking water. Instead, the pipeline crosses under the Missouri River at Lake Oahe, a reservoir that provides water for the Standing Rock reservation and others downstream.In September 2016 federal officials stopped construction of the pipeline on lands bordering or under Lake Oahe belonging to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the federal agency responsible for permitting on public lands and waterways. In December, President Barack Obama blocked construction on the disputed segment of the pipeline.In one of his first actions following his inauguration, President Donald Trump instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to move forward with the pipeline’s environmental review to speed up the process. On Feb. 8, the Corps gave permission to the company developing the pipeline to continue construction.Oil is expected to flow through the North Dakota Access Pipeline by this weekend, said Mauai, following the morning session in a conversation with Episcopal News Service.“That really deflated us on Standing Rock,” said Mauai “But I’m hoping this [conference] will raise awareness across the world because it’s not only happening at Standing Rock, there are other places where this is happening, in Navajoland and other reservations in the United States. And I’m hoping that Standing Rock made an impression, that people are going to say ‘Okay, this is huge because it’s a threat to the tribe’s water source and those around it.’”Even if the oil is flowing through the pipeline, though, the story isn’t over, said Mauai.“We will continue to speak to whomever will hear us. The church will continue to take an active role, we were active in the cleanup … we’ll go forward whatever the tribe needs from us as a church we’ll be there to assist however we can,” he said.Thousands of Episcopalians joined others in support of the Sioux Nation, most recently during March 10 Native Nations Rise demonstration and rally in Washington, D.C.Archbishop Winston Halapua, one of three primates of the Anglican Church in Polynesia and Aotearoa New Zealand, responsible for New Zealand-based Samoan, Tongan, Indo-Fijian, and Fijian congregations, talked about his childhood and growing up in Tonga, where his life was in sync with the tide cycle.Sea-level rise continues to claim whole islands in the Pacific, where the Anglican Church of Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia is establishing a “clear resilience strategy” to strengthen its response to future natural disasters in the Pacific islands.“Water is a reflection of God; you and I don’t live without water,” said Halapua.–  Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service.  Richard McClellan says: March 29, 2017 at 6:33 pm I am horrified by the actions of the Trump administration. Removing EPA, the Arts, Public Education, food for children, Meals on Wheels, increase guns & bombs, inventing facts, ignoring climate change, subverting research, building more pipelines for dirty oil, & disregarding treaties made with the sovereign nations indigenous to this land. WATER is life; without it nothing lives – neither flora or fauna. Both the UN and the USA say that water is a right. NOTHING, public or private ought to even come close to destroying clean water. That means, private profits ought never be put above the water right, nor the treaty rights of ANY person or persons. I am sick and tired of Corporations/Government running over the Indigenous peoples, the poor, sanctuary seekers & immigrants of the USA. Putting oil pipes under a water source is stupid. The news is filled with oil leaks via pipes & oil tankers. Greed is not the mark of a Compassionate people. We have an epidemic of greed in the White House, the majority government & its corporation cronies. It is totally against my values. I want to scream, pound my fists, run up to Washington D.C. and tell them, No, No, No!!! Dakota Access Pipeline, Rector Tampa, FL Donald Heacock says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Indigenous Ministries, Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA March 25, 2017 at 6:16 pm Thank you for another way to seek solutions. I really appreciate it. But instead of calling people out as a ‘thing’ a ‘leftist’, or as someone who is seperate from you (I tend to think essentially were all the same – we just think and act differently – but those differences are no threat to our unity as one people, because the last time I took a look, we all live on this planet and we’re all in this together) please let me ask you to reply to this question:Where is God in all of this? Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET March 24, 2017 at 9:44 pm No one disputes human right to water and sanitation. There is crisis from polluted water to shortage of water in all countries including US. We as a community need to solve this issue. UN is no more corrupt than governments, politicians, corporations & people in every country. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel March 25, 2017 at 1:51 pm There was plenty of notice and opportunity for protesters to leave as well as clean up after themselves. The mess the protestors left was a disgrace. Quoting from Scripture doesn’t give people the right to disobey a lawful order.Water Justice is just another way for the left and globalist to push for climate change. Doesn’t the EPA already have enough regulations governing how we use and treat water in this country? Nurya Love Parish says: Advocacy Peace & Justice, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA March 27, 2017 at 8:05 pm The super wealthy will continue to rape, pillage and plunder this planet for their own ego. Come Lord Jesus! Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Pjcabbiness says: Richard McClellan says: Rector Martinsville, VA By Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 24, 2017 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Standing Rock Press Release Service Joey Clavijo says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Pjcabbiness says: Bill Louis says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET March 28, 2017 at 2:22 am The super wealthy will continue to invest capital, employ workers and develop technologies that create the engines of progress on this planet. Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Comments are closed. Rector Collierville, TN Environment & Climate Change, Featured Events March 31, 2017 at 7:42 am Yes they will, but there are others of the “I got mine, screw you” attitude who will continue to take more than they need. Facts are facts. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA March 25, 2017 at 11:56 am It is hard to “clean up truck loads of garbage” when you are chased out of your land by police forces. And calling the protesters “gangs.” Perhaps there should be more reading of the prophets by church groups rather than Leviticus. March 24, 2017 at 8:12 pm Finally some people who make sense. Did the Deacon of North Dakota or other members of Standing Rock assist in cleaning up the truck loads of garbage the gangs left when the left on the land the tribe said was sacred? Comments (11) Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release March 24, 2017 at 1:56 pm Leftist, incremental, ecofascist political action wrapped in the cloth of the Church. Water issues can be addressed in large part by infrastructure development, economic expansion and the operation of open, free market capitalism. The left, of course, is opposed to dams, canals, hydroelectric plants, foreign investment, etc., so don’t bother approaching the problem with common sense and the desire to implement clear, rational solutions. Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Jawaharlal Prasad says: Submit a Job Listing John Miller says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Janet Diehl says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

La visita del Obispo Primado alienta a los habitantes de…

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Hurricane Maria, Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME La visita del Obispo Primado alienta a los habitantes de las Islas Vírgenes exhaustos por el huracán ‘No están solos’ les dijo Curry a los residentes que enfrentan estrés y recuperación a largo plazo Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 El obispo primado Michael Curry abraza y saluda a episcopales luego de presidir un nutrido oficio eucarístico el 11 de enero en la catedral de Todos los Santos de Santo Tomás, en las Islas Vírgenes de Estados Unidos. El oficio y la recepción que siguió fueron parte de su visita pastoral para ofrecer aliento a los afectados por los huracanes Irma y María en septiembre. La Iglesia está comprometida a ayudar a través del proceso de recuperación a largo plazo, dijo Curry. Foto de Amy Sowder/ENS.[Episcopal News Service — Santo Tomás, Islas Vírgenes de EE.UU.] George Sebastian se acuclilló en el pasillo con su esposa mientras presenciaba cómo el huracán Irma levantaba el techo de su casa en Santo Tomás [St. Thomas] Islas Vírgenes de EE.UU., el 6 de septiembre.“Estaba observando, esperando, orando”, dijo Sebastian, feligrés de la catedral de Todos los Santos [All Saints Cathedral] mientras señalaba hacia su casa en una cuesta distante. “Estaba angustiado. Perdí todo en unos minutos”.Unos cuatro meses después, Sebastian tiene un techo nuevo y conduce al obispo primado Michael Curry y a su grupo alrededor de la isla durante una visita pastoral a la Diócesis de las Islas Vírgenes del 10 al 12 de enero. Curry escuchó a los episcopales compartir las dificultades y el estrés que siguieron al huracán. Él discutió de qué manera la Iglesia puede contribuir a fortalecer los espíritus y las comunidades.Desde la horrenda temporada ciclónica de 2017, los relatos como el de Sebastian abundan en la Diócesis de las Islas Vírgenes. Curry se esforzó en alentar a los feligreses.“Si siguen a Jesús, no están solos”, dijo Curry a un nutrido público en la catedral de Todos los Santos. “La verdad es que resulta fácil olvidar eso porque la vida tiene su modo de abrumarnos”.George Sebastian, miembro de la catedral de Todos los Santos en Santo Tomás, Islas Vírgenes de EE.UU., perdió el techo de su casa y gran parte de lo que estaba dentro. Foto cortesía de George Sebastian.Además de los problemas logísticos causados por la distancia física entre las islas y el territorio continental de EE.UU., existe el estrés de la desconexión emocional. Muchos isleños dicen que se sienten muy lejos de los pensamientos de los habitantes del continente y de los beneficios que estos disfrutan. La aparentemente interminable embestida de desastres naturales u ocasionados por los seres humanos puede dar lugar a que la gente padezca también de fatiga de la compasión.“Cuando se vayan, no nos olviden”, instó Derek Gabriel, un feligrés de la catedral de Todos los Santos.Los efectos a largo plazo sobre las Islas VírgenesEl 6 de septiembre, el huracán Irma azotó las Islas Vírgenes, y el 20 de septiembre, María le dio a las islas una segunda batida, ciclones tropicales ambos de categoría 5. Irma castigó más a Santo Tomás y a San Juan [St. John]. Luego María se ensañó con Santa Cruz [St. Croix], la mayor de todas las Islas Vírgenes.Cuatro meses después, los cruceros han regresado, pero algunos edificios siguen destrozados, sin muros y con las vigas al aire, y los techos de metal corrugado siguen enrollados, como prueba de los feroces vientos de las tormentas. Gran parte de las Islas Vírgenes sigue sin reparar con lonas azules coloreando el paisaje, aunque ya se ha restaurado el 90 por ciento de la energía eléctrica.La casa de George Sebastian, el presidente del club de hombres de la catedral de Todos los Santos ya está reparada y él y su esposa pueden vivir allí de nuevo. Foto cortesía de George Sebastian.La Diócesis Episcopal de las Islas Vírgenes consta de 14 congregaciones en las cinco islas, algunas gobernadas por Estados Unidos y otras por Gran Bretaña. Las islas estadounidenses con iglesias episcopales son Santa Cruz, Santo Tomás y San Juan. Las islas británicas tienen iglesias anglicanas en Virgen Gorda y Tórtola.Como el único individuo del personal que es empleado de jornada completa, el obispo diocesano Ambrose Gumbs dirige cuatro oficios en tres localidades cada domingo. Cuando Curry le preguntó cómo lo hacía, Gumbs replicó: “Sobreviviendo. A veces uno desea poder escaparse y cuando regresas, es igual que antes”.Varias personas mayores han muerto desde el paso del huracán. ´´Hay muchísima gente estresada. Muchísimos que no tienen seguros. Aún hay caos, y el costo del trabajo se ha puesto por las nubes”.Curry y su grupo se reunieron con Osbert Potter, el Teniente Gobernador de las Islas Vírgenes, quien les dijo que la recuperación tomaría mucho tiempo.“Nuestro próximo empeño es soterrar las líneas de la electricidad”, dijo Potter.De izquierda a derecha: el obispo Todd Ousley de la Oficina de Desarrollo Pastoral de la Iglesia Episcopal, el obispo primado Michael Curry, el teniente gobernador de las Islas Vírgenes de Estados Unidos Osbert Potter y el obispo de las Islas Vírgenes Ambrose Gumbs conversan sobre la recuperación  [de los estragos causados por] el huracán y el papel de la Iglesia en ayudar a la comunidad,  en una reunión el 10 de enero en la Casa de Gobierno en Santo Tomás. Foto de Amy Sowder/ENS.El éxodo de más de 4.000 personas ha causado toda clase de problemas. Los agentes de la policía y los maestros se han ido. Los empleados de los hoteles también se han ido o están desempleados, ya que muchos hoteles no podrían abrir hasta el verano, dijo Potter. Los territorios estadounidenses perdieron cuatro escuelas, de manera que bien las familias se han mudado al continente o han enviado a sus hijos a vivir en el continente.Iniciativas del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo “Si ante no sabíamos acerca del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, ahora ciertamente sí sabemos”, dijo Rosalie Simmonds-Ballentine, canciller diocesana y representante laica ante el Consejo Consultivo Anglicano.“Ellos realmente le hicieron frente al reto y nos ayudaron”, dijo Simmonds-Ballentine, que también es miembro de la junta directiva de la organización.Trabajadores del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo han inspeccionado todas las iglesias y otras propiedades de la diócesis en las cinco islas, dijo Jay Rollins, el asesor de asistencia en caso de desastres de la organización, el cual vive en Santa Cruz.La organización evaluó lo que el equipo de voluntarios puede hacer inmediatamente, en el medio plazo y a largo plazo, dijo Rollins. Él ayudó a crear un comité diocesano de respuesta al desastre que incluye a representantes de cada isla, más un representante de la juventud.“Estamos atendiendo no sólo a la recuperación, sino a la preparación para el desastre. No sólo para los huracanes”, dijo Rollins.Rob Radtke, presidente del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, se unió a la gira pastoral de Curry para orientar y aprender cómo los miembros de la diócesis están manejando las iniciativas de recuperación a largo plazo.“Creo que en tiempos problemáticos, todo el mundo se une”, dijo Radtke.Iglesias de las Islas VírgenesDonnalie Cabey saltó y gritó con entusiasmo mientras estaba de pie al fondo de la nave de la iglesia episcopal de San Andrés [St. Andrew’s]  en Santo Tomás. “Acabo de recobrar la energía eléctrica esta tarde. El Obispo Primado trajo la energía”, dijo Cabey, esposa del Rdo. Lenroy K. Cabey, rector de la iglesia.El agua subió casi un metro dentro de la iglesia, de manera que hubo que quitar la alfombra, y no hubo electricidad en cuatro meses. Las primeras semanas después del huracán Irma, los episcopales se reunían en el oscuro salón parroquial valiéndose de linternas. Luego, un generador les proporcionaba energía durante los oficios.El 10 de enero, representantes de los tres deanatos de la diócesis informaron sobre el estado de sus edificios y su feligresía.“Les llamaremos Irmaría”, dijo el subdeán Leroy Claxton refiriéndose como un solo fenómeno a los dos huracanes, Irma y María, que azotaron en septiembre.Representantes de los tres deanatos de las Diócesis de las Islas Vírgenes  presentaron informes de los daños ocasionados por el huracán al obispo primado Michael Curry y su grupo el 10 de enero en la catedral de San Andrés, Santo Tomás, en las Islas Vírgenes de EE.UU. Foto de Amy Sowder/ENS.Los episcopales describieron a Tórtola después de Irma como un sitio bombardeado. En Santa María [St. Mary’s ] en Virgen Gorda, además de los daños del techo, la destrucción del pabellón y la inundación de la rectoría, el campanario se desplomó directamente sobre las tumbas, y rompió varias lápidas.“Necesitamos ayuda. No voy a pintar un panorama esperanzador”, dijo Denise Reovan, la deana de Santa María.Los residentes de Santa Cruz [St. Croix] vaciaron las tiendas para ayudar a Santo Tomás después del huracán Irma, pero luego vino María y azotó Santa Cruz apenas dos semanas después cuando sus suministros estaban en falta.En San Andrés, la membresía descendió de más de 300 a alrededor de 50, dijo Hilarie Baker, guardiana mayor. Veinticinco miembros reportaron sus casas como pérdidas totales.“Muchos se relocalizaron debido a enfermedad, pérdida de empleo o al cierre de las escuelas de sus hijos. Estamos esperanzados de que muchos miembros regresarán”, dijo Baker.El obispo primado Michael Curry ofrece aliento y dirección espiritual mientras también escucha testimonios de tristeza, de dolor y de esperanza de clérigos de distintas partes de la Diócesis de las Islas Vírgenes en una reunión el 11 de enero en la oficina diocesana en Santo Tomás. Foto de Amy Sowder/ENS.A la mañana siguiente, el 11 de enero,  clérigos de todas las islas se reunieron en la oficina diocesana  para compartir con Curry su dolor, sus preocupaciones y sus esperanzas.“Puede que no haya ningún llamado más difícil, en buenos y malos tiempos”, dijo Curry a unos 15 miembros del clero. “Este va a ser un trabajo a largo plazo, no un remedio inmediato, y estamos comprometidos a hacerlo”.Escuelas episcopales reducidasLa matrícula escolar se ha reducido en todas las islas. El número de alumnos de las escuelas públicas se ha duplicado en todos los centros docentes que no quedaron destruidos, algunos de los cuales asisten a sesiones matutinas mientras otros asisten por la tarde.“Nada es lo mismo en la escuela. Nada es lo mismo en la casa. Es un reto”, dijo Gumbs.En la escuela de la catedral de Todos los Santos, alumnos de 3 a 18 años disfrutaron de un mensaje del obispo primado Michael Curry el 12 de enero. Él les contó anécdotas divertidas para recordarles a los estudiantes que ellos cuentan todo el tiempo con la fuerza de Dios. Foto de Amy Sowder/ENSAunque las clases han estado en marcha a jornada completa desde el 2 de octubre, con exclusión de los días feriados, ha habido muchísimos daños en la escuela secundaria de San Jorge [St. George’s Secondary School] que es parte de la iglesia anglicana de San Jorge [St. George’s] en Tórtola, una isla británica, dijo la directora Antoinette Rock. La matrícula descendió de 111 alumnos a 72 después de los huracanes. Eso significa menos dinero de matrículas para pagar los salarios de los maestros y los gastos.“Nos juntamos para limpiar los escombros y remover los árboles, y sin financiación”, dijo Rock. “Pero he llegado a un punto en el que me estoy sintiendo muy frustrada. Tuvimos dos huracanes en septiembre, y estamos en enero, y aún no se han hecho reparaciones en la escuela”.En la catedral de Todos los Santos, en Santo Tomás, la matrícula de los alumnos de 3 a 18 años descendió de 240 a 214 después de Irma, dijo la presidente de la junta escolar Lynette Petty-Amey.No obstante, las clases avanzaban a toda máquina. Krishiv Amarnani, de 10 años, salió de su clase para compartir que la mitad del techo del condominio de su familia en un central azucarero había volado por los aires.“Gran parte de mis equipos deportivos se han perdido, pero sí pude salvar mis trofeos de  fútbol y de ortografía”, dijo Krishiv.Los funcionarios docentes crearon una página de donaciones para la recuperación de huracanes en su página web al objeto de financiar reparaciones de techos y compra de  baldosas de techo, mallas de ventana, libros y material didáctico, dijo Ardrina Elliott, la directora de desarrollo de la escuela.“Nos mantenemos optimistas por los niños, porque resulta muy fácil deprimirse. Muchísimas tiendas han cerrado. La gente ha perdido empleos, no hay ningún hospital que esté trabajando a plena capacidad, hay correos que están dañados. Recibir correspondencia toma tres semanas”.Estos habitante de las Islas Vírgenes instan al resto del mundo a tenerles presente mientras rehacen sus vidas.La Rda. Sandra Walters Malone, vicaria de la misión de San Pablo [St. Paul’s Mission] en Tórtola, tiene una casa que ha quedado gravemente afectada y miembros de su congregación que se encuentran sin hogar, algunos de ellos viviendo en autos y recibiendo alimentos semanalmente.“Luego de la inmediatez del desastre, las personas prosiguen con sus vidas y se olvidan que aún están en medio del caos”, dijo Malone. “A veces ayuda saber tan sólo que otros piensan en uno”.— Amy Sowder es corresponsal especial de Episcopal News Service y escritora independiente radicada en Brooklyn. Pueden dirigirse a ella a [email protected] Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Presiding Bishop Michael Curry TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Hurricane Irma, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Por Amy SowderPosted Jan 17, 2018 Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN 2017 Hurricanes, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

Jury acquits Baltimore uprising defendant

first_imgAfter just 30 minutes of deliberations following a two-day trial, on Oct. 13 a Baltimore jury found Alkebu-Lan Marcus not guilty. Marcus was one of hundreds of protesters arrested after the Baltimore police killing of Freddie Grey.  He had joined thousands of youth in Baltimore in taking over the streets — an uprising that was only quelled through the use of thousands of city cops, state troopers and National Guard soldiers.  The fact that Grey was the 353rd person killed by cops in 2015 in the U.S. was a major factor in the two-week-long rebellion (killedbypolice.net)Left to right – Alkebu-Lan Marcus, Morgan Malachi, J. Wyndal Gordon.WW photo: Joseph PIetteMarcus was charged with “failure to obey a lawful order” and “interfering with an arrest” during mass protests on April 25.  The arrest took place when a police squad rushed onto a crowded sidewalk to arrest Morgan Malachi.  Marcus was arrested when he and others tried to pull Malachi out of police hands.Marcus and Morgan Malachi were both part of a “Philly Is Baltimore” contingent.  Malachi was eventually charged with disorderly conduct and “refusal to obey a lawful order.”  Video of their arrests clearly shows all she was doing was speaking into a bullhorn.  There was no cause for an arrest and she was finally acquitted at the end of her trial on July 23.Following Marcus’ trial, defense lawyer J. Wyndal Gordon told the press, “The prosecution of Mr. Marcus was an attempt to suppress free speech.”  He said there was no evidence of an order to disperse, despite prosecution claims.  “No one heard it.  It was like a dog whistle that only police heard.”Gordon also pointed out: “You have the right to resist an unlawful arrest.  A person who comes to the aid of someone who is unlawfully being arrested — you have that right as well.”Members of the Philly Coalition for Racial, Economic and Legal Justice, the Philadelphia Trayvon Martin Organizing Committee and the Baltimore Peoples Power Assembly rallied with signs outside the courthouse during the court proceedings and made sure the courtroom was packed with supporters.The epidemic of police killings that motivated the protests in Baltimore; Philadelphia; New York; Cleveland; Ferguson, Mo.; Oakland, Calif.; and many other cities continues.  As of Oct. 12, the death count of men, women and children, including trans people, who have perished as a result of confrontations with cops in 2015 is 923.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

New art exhibit to feature deceased artists

first_img Lois Brantley is among the deceased artist of Pike County whose work is displayed only in family homes or, perhaps, packed away and maybe even forgotten.The upcoming “Roots Exhibit: The Late Artists of Pike County” is an opportunity for the artwork of many of these artists to be displayed, celebrated and appreciated.Morgan Drinkard, Johnson Center executive director, said that the Late Artists of Pike County exhibit is part of the Center’s continuing “Roots” series.“The ‘Roots’ series is designed to highlight Pike County artists,” Drinkard said. “So far, we have exhibited both 2D and 3D pieces of Pike County artists as well as the ‘masters,’ Jean Lake and Pugh Windham. We are honored to highlight the artwork of the late artists of Pike County. We want to celebrate and catalogue the artwork that is in homes and other places where it is not viewed publicly.” Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Book Nook to reopen The Johnson Center received a grant from the Alabama State Council on the Arts that will assist with cataloging artwork that is displayed at the Johnson Center and other artwork of note that is created by Pike County artists.We are honored to highlight the artwork of the late artists of Pike County. We want to celebrate and catalogue the artwork that is in homes and other places where it is not viewed publicly.”The Johnson Center received a grant from the Alabama State Council on the Arts that will assist with cataloging artwork that is displayed at the Johnson Center and other artwork of note that is created by Pike County artists.The “Roots Exhibit: The Late Artists of Pike County” will open Nov. 14 at the Johnson Center for the Arts and run through Dec. 18. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson New art exhibit to feature deceased artists Wiley White of the Johnson Center for the Arts in Troy visited with Martha Brantley Fleming to look at possible exhibit inclusions.White, Johnson Center development director, viewed the artwork of Fleming’s mother, Lois Brantley, as a prospect for an upcoming exhibition at the Johnson Center for the Arts featuring deceased artists of Pike County.Lois Brantley of the Banks community began painting when she was in her 70s and was a prolific china painter.“The quality of Lois Brantley’s work was fabulous,” White said. “China painting was very popular at one time and many women took classes. Some were excellent, and Lois Brantley was among them.” Latest Stories Email the author Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits By The Penny Hoarder Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Sponsored Content White said Brantley’s work was elegant and had a special quality that sets it apart.“Her work is exceptional,” she said. “It’s absolutely beautiful. And the quantity and variety of her work is amazing. She painted dinnerware, pitchers, vases and lamps and to think that she began painting late in life.”Brantley also painted on canvas. Her artwork was simple, White said, but very good. Published 11:01 pm Wednesday, October 2, 2013 By Jaine Treadwell Skip Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration You Might Like Troy Regional undergoes reflective cosmetic changes Trees have been removed from the front of Troy Regional Medical Center and the building has received a fresh coat… read more Print Article Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Limitation of egg production in Calanus finmarchicus in the field: a stoichiometric analysis

first_imgThe egg production of marine copepods correlates with a range of variables, including the availability of organic carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) 20:5(n-3) (EPA) and 22:6(n-3) (DHA). However, an understanding of which substrates limit egg production in the natural environment has yet to be reached. The quantities of C, N, EPA and DHA ingested, derived from parental biomass, and invested in eggs by female Calanus finmarchicus during a 5-day incubation experiment were examined using stoichiometric theory to determine which substrate was limiting. The majority of each substrate was derived from parental biomass, and therefore the existing stoichiometric theory is developed to include this route of supply. The females were essentially devoid of lipid reserves, as evidenced by the lack of the storage fatty acids 20:1 (n-9) and 22:1 (n-11), and carbon limitation was predicted under most of the scenarios examined. Nitrogen limitation was only apparent when carbon and nitrogen utilisation efficiencies were assumed to be high (0.5) and low (0.4) respectively. PUFAs were assumed to be utilised with high efficiency (0.9), and were never predicted to limit production. This work highlights the need for a more detailed understanding of the maintenance requirements that marine copepods have for C, N, EPA, and DHA and hence the efficiencies with these substrates can be utilised for growth. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Radiation effects on satellites during extreme space weather events

first_imgHigh‐energy trapped electrons in the Van Allen belts pose a threat to the survivability of orbiting spacecraft. Two key radiation effects are total ionising dose (TID) and displacement damage dose (DDD) in components and materials, both of which cause cumulative and largely irreversible damage. During an extreme space weather event, trapped electron fluxes in the Van Allen belts can increase by several orders of magnitude in intensity, leading to an enhanced risk of satellite failure. We use extreme environments generated by modelling and statistical analyses to estimate the consequences for satellites in terms of the radiation effects described above. A worst‐case event could lead to significant losses in power generating capability ‐ up to almost 8% ‐ and cause up to four years’ worth of ionising dose degradation, leading to component damage and a life‐shortening effect on satellites. The consequences of such losses are hugely significant given our increasing reliance on satellites for a vast array of services, including communication, navigation, defence and critical infrastructure.last_img read more