Tour Diary – Women’s 30’s

first_imgTour Diary – Women’s 30’s Match 2Day Two of the Masters Trans Tasman Series for the Women’s 30’s started with a momentary lapse of judgement from Captain Giselle Martin, aka Carl Williams. Taken down by Kirstie Wakely in Underbelly 4 – Masters Murders, the tale of the silent assassin (in our team game of assassins which has been taking place this week).We were full of enthusiasm for a big day against the Kiwis with Megan ‘Moogsy’ Fritsch jumping the toast queue, trying to get a jump on the opposition. The girls prepared for their second match by cheering on the Men’s 50’s and 45’s as they took out the series, providing motivation to make it another series win for the Aussies. The hot Townsville sun (28 degrees) beamed down on the bodies of the finely tuned specimens of the 30’s ladies, thanks to the fantastic support of the physios, pool sessions and ice baths.The team took the field pumped up to take out the series, and we were successful 7-2 after a tight first half 3-2. Captain courageous put her body on the line and has the graze to prove it. Her run from acting half to the sub box was a run the Judd’s would be proud of. The second half broke open scoring four unanswered touchdowns, with a real team effort. The reward for the hard fought win was a team ice bath. The girls are now looking forward to another fun night together watching the Cowboys take on the Raiders with the Townsville folk. Word on the street is that the ladies may be making a special appearance at two local weddings ‘Deb Steinhardt’ style. Invitation is no obstacle. So we are left to ponder who will be the silent assassin, and can the ladies make it a 3-nil whitewash!!!Australian Women’s 30’slast_img read more

Shaq Lawson: “We’re Going To Show Dalvin Cook Why He Should Have Come To Clemson”

first_imgShaq Lawson interviewed ahead of FSU game.shaq lawson clemson dalvin cook florida stateClemson and Florida State are set to tangle this Saturday, and more than likely, the contest will decide which team wins the Atlantic division in the ACC. Despite losing the last three matchups to the Seminoles, at least one Tigers player is confident about how his team will perform. Junior defensive end Shaq Lawson talked a bit of trash Monday, telling reporters that he believes that the Tigers will “show Dalvin Cook why he should have come to Clemson” by the time the game is over. Cook, at one point, was committed to play for the Tigers before flipping and attending FSU [email protected]_Lawson90 “We’re going to show Dalvin Cook why he should have come to Clemson by the end of the night.” pic.twitter.com/X0tZSNpkXP— CUTigers.com (@CUTigers_com) November 2, 2015#Clemson DE Shaq Lawson talks trash: “We’re going to show Dalvin Cook why he should have come to Clemson by the end of the night.” #FSU— Tom D’Angelo (@tomdangelo44) November 2, 2015Tigernet.com has video of the press conference, if you’re interested.Cook has become a star this year, rushing for over 1,000 yards in just seven games. If Clemson is actually able to shut him down (provided he plays), it’ll have a much easier time leaving Memorial Stadium victorious.last_img read more

The Latest China US discuss plans for trade talks

first_imgBEIJING — The Latest on the back and forth between China and the U.S. over trade, technology and the arrest of an executive of the Chinese network gear company Huawei Technologies. (All times local):5:20 p.m.China’s foreign minister has vowed to defend its citizens abroad as a Chinese technology executive waits to see whether a Canadian court will release her on bail in a case that has strained U.S.-Chinese relations.Foreign Minister Wang Yi said Tuesday that Beijing will “spare no effort” to protect against “any bullying that infringes the legitimate rights and interests of Chinese citizens.”Wang didn’t mention the arrested Huawei Technologies Ltd. executive, Meng Wanzhou. But a ministry spokesman, Lu Kang, said Wang was referring to cases of all Chinese abroad, including Meng.Meng was arrested Dec. 1 in Vancouver on U.S. charges related to possible violations of trade sanctions on Iran.___11:50 a.m.China’s government says its economic czar and the U.S. Treasury secretary have discussed plans for the next round of talks in a tariff battle following a temporary cease-fire.The Commerce Ministry’s announcement Tuesday suggests negotiations are going ahead despite tension over the arrest of a Chinese technology executive.A ministry statement said Vice Premier Liu He and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin discussed “the promotion of the next economic and trade consultations” but gave no details.President Donald Trump agreed on Dec. 1 to postpone more U.S. tariff hikes on Chinese goods for 90 days while the two sides negotiate over American complaints about Beijing technology policy.The arrest in Canada last week of a Huawei Technologies Ltd. executive prompted worries those talks might be derailed.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Oil and gas sector cautious as clock ticks down to Trans Mountain

first_imgThe company counts Imperial Oil Ltd. and Cenovus Energy Inc. among its customers, both of whom have delayed building or completing steam-driven oilsands projects because of uncertainty about how they will get the oil to market.Analyst Samir Kayande, a director with RS Energy Group, says the expansion to triple capacity of the existing Trans Mountain pipeline will help with market access when it comes on stream but that likely won’t happen until 2022 and could be held up by more legal challenges.He says the pipeline isn’t big enough to fix Western Canada’s oil transportation woes on its own, nor does it address the general downturn in energy investing in North America and the lower quality of Canada’s resources compared to premier U.S. oil and gas basins.“Even though it’s positive and it’s important, the impact on the investment climate will probably be a little bit muted at least until you can actually start construction,” said Kayande.“It really depends on what the next round of legal challenges looks like.” CALGARY, A.B. – Observers on the front lines of Western Canada’s oil and gas sector are looking forward to what’s widely expected to be approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion on Tuesday while acknowledging the decision by Ottawa won’t solve all problems.CEO Clayton Byrt of Pimee Well Servicing LP, a service rig company owned by six northern Alberta First Nations, says approval of the pipeline is a “big deal” because it will encourage investment by the oilsands producers he counts as customers.He says more activity will support Pimee’s ability to retain its 140 employees, almost all Indigenous, and eventually grow the company to continue to offer good jobs to First Nations members.last_img read more

PEVC inflows double to 7 billion in March

first_imgMumbai: Venture capital/private equity investments doubled in March to $7 billion on an annualised basis, boosted by a spurt in large transactions, says a report. Exits during the month were 34 percent lower at $465 million involving 13 transactions, a report by consultancy firm EY said Thursday. March was the best month ever for private equity (PE) and venture capital (VC ) investments, it said, adding that the $7-billion mark in the month was more than Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscaldouble of $3 billion in the previous year and over 30 percent higher than the previous high of $5.4 billion clocked in August 2017. Thirteen large deals of $100 million-plus adding up to $6 billion helped boost the numbers, and Brookfields $1.9 billion buyout of Reliance Industries Ltd (RIL’s) East-West Pipeline was the largest deal during the month. On the back of a busy March, the March quarter has emerged as the best ever quarter for private equity/ venture capital investments, with investments worth $11.4 billion, up 37 percent over the same period a year ago. The month also recorded highest monthly value and number of buyout deals, aggregating at $2.8 billion across seven deals. Private investment in public equity investments rose to $1.9 billion, but massivley down from $3 billion a year ago. From a fund raising perspective, the firepower plunged to a low $40 million in March from $1.1 billion a year ago.last_img read more

A Head Coach Botched The End Of The Super Bowl And It

These are gaudy numbers. Lynch is clearly an unstoppable force going up against an extremely moveable object. Why wouldn’t Carroll give him the ball?First, some amount of passing is, at least theoretically, probably necessary. It’s unlikely that the optimal strategy is to run 100 percent of the time because if a team did that, the opponent would adjust accordingly. But for the purposes of this analysis, I’m going to assume that, for any given play from the 1-yard line, running was Seattle’s best option.An NFL head coach’s goal isn’t to maximize his team’s chances of scoring a touchdown on a given play; it’s to maximize its chances of winning the game. That distinction seems to have gotten lost in all the rancor and rush to condemn Carroll.Second, the fateful play didn’t take place as time expired. There were 26 seconds left. Let’s see what Seahawks offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell had to say:“We were conscious of how much time was on the clock, and we wanted to use it all.”But why would that lead to a pass? That takes less time off the clock than rushing. Let’s see what Carroll had to say:“We were going to run the ball in to win the game, but not on that play,” he said. “I didn’t want to waste a run play on their goal-line guys. It was a clear thought, but it didn’t work out right.”Defiant! Basically, he thought the Seahawks were going to score regardless, so he was willing to waste a play on a pass. If they scored, fine. But if they didn’t, at least they would’ve run a few seconds off the clock.Sounds crazy, but he’s right: With 26 seconds left and only one timeout, the Seahawks couldn’t run Lynch three times in a row. If they rushed on second down, didn’t make it in, called timeout, rushed again, and still didn’t make it in, they’d probably be out of time before they could get off another play. So, the Seahawks had three downs to work with, but they could only run Lynch twice at most.Thus the question isn’t whether the Seahawks should’ve called a run — we’ve already stipulated that. The question is when they should’ve called a run.And this is where the logic of those Harvard tweets undoes itself. If Lynch were a sure thing, the Seahawks definitely wouldn’t run on second down. They’d want to run time off the clock. The scenario would be the same as when a team can win with a short field goal. Because the field goal is a sure thing, the team is willing to wait.But as great as Lynch is, he isn’t the same a kicker attempting a 20-yard field goal. For this analysis, I’m going to assume he’s about 80 percent. If that sounds high or low, it doesn’t really matter: It’s not the most important factor in the calculation. The most important thing is the odds of the Patriots coming back to win if the Seahawks score too quickly.Based on Advanced Football Analytics’ Win Probability Calculator, a team starting at the 25-yard line and down three points with 20 seconds left in the game will win about 5 percent of the time. However, there are a few problems with this:AFA’s model may broadly underestimate the ability of modern kickers.Even if it is generally right relative to the league today, it is still calibrated to the average NFL kicker, whereas Patriots kicker Stephen Gostkowski is one of the best long-range kickers in the league. Over his career, he has made 14 of 18 kicks from over 50 yards (78 percent), including eight of nine in the past three years.The Patriots’ offense is not typical. It’s Tom Brady’s. Brady eats pieces of game-winning drives for breakfast.Let’s spot the Pats some yards, then, and assume the Patriots win1Probably in overtime. about as often as a typical team in the AFA model would2In overtime or regulation. if they started on the 40-yard line. That would give them a 14 percent chance. Maybe that’s generous, but we’re looking for an upper bound.A secondary factor, noted by Brian Burke of AFA, is that stopping the clock by passing on second down also forces the defense to defend both the pass and run on third down (because the Seahawks still had a timeout). That would make Carroll’s decision better, so I’ll give him a 5 percent bonus in the “pro-passing” scenario and none in the pro-run scenario.The main objection to this thinking seems to be: “But the risk of throwing an interception was too great.” As evidenced by, you know, the fact that Wilson threw an interception.For this, I’ll turn first to Mike Sando, who had this to tweet: Everyone knew it was coming. Second-and-1 on the 1-yard line. Marshawn Lynch was waiting in the backfield, poised to do what he was put on this Earth to do: Get a touchdown — this touchdown. The football gods had telegraphed how they wanted the game to end, directing a floating ball straight into Jermaine Kearse’s hands. Beast Mode was going to drag the New England team kicking and screaming into the end zone if he had to. But the play call came in, Russell Wilson attempted a doomed pass that Malcolm Butler intercepted, and it was Seattle that punched and screamed its way off the field.The Web erupted in outrage that Beast Mode never got his moment. For Seahawks fans, calling a pass was essentially Pete Carroll denying his team’s fate. For many others, it seemed like an inexplicable miscue.“Pete Carroll botches the Super Bowl,” wrote Ian O’Connor, simply stating what most people were thinking.The first wave of stats to roll in wasn’t particularly favorable either: As noted by my colleague Neil Paine, the Harvard Sports Analysis Collective laid out the damning facts: That’s right. On the 1-yard line, QBs threw 66 touchdowns with no interceptions prior to Wilson’s errant toss.3This season’s goal-line interception rate is fairly low though. Since 2001, on second-and-1s on the goal line, quarterbacks have thrown interceptions on about 2 percent of passes. Not mentioned: They also scored four touchdowns on scrambles (which Wilson is pretty good at last I checked). That’s a 60.9 percent success rate.Just for comparison’s sake, here’s how more than 200 runs fared this year in the same situation:125 led to touchdowns.94 failed to score.Of those, 23 were for loss of yardage.Two resulted in lost fumbles.So overall, runs do a bit worse than passes (57.1 percent vs. 60.9 percent).But the Seahawks don’t have an average rusher; they have Beast Mode. As I said, we’re stipulating that he’s way more likely to score than a pass is, so his exact number doesn’t matter very much for our calculations. It does matter that he isn’t particularly fumble-prone — but he has still fumbled about 1 percent of the time in his career, which means passing carries an extra 1 percentage point of risk.On the other hand, due to the peculiar scenario, it behooves a QB to play extremely carefully. Throwing an incomplete pass only moves the needle a tiny bit, whereas throwing an interception is devastating. Thus a coach might believe that his QB will throw a pick even less often than normal. So, we’ll try favorable and unfavorable assumptions about that as well.Putting these various factors together, we can assign probabilities to various outcomes like so:This isn’t about passions, and it isn’t about statistical mumbo-jumbo. It’s about arithmetic.Under the most pro-Beast set of assumptions, rushing may have been the better play but by the slimmest of margins (0.3 percentage points). Under a more pro-Gostkowski set of assumptions, passing may have been the best play by up to 3 percentage points.But we’re still discussing marginal improvements in odds. Pick which assumptions you like; it doesn’t really matter. Carroll’s decision wasn’t the epically bad call many have made it out to be.On the other handMeanwhile, the coach on the other sideline had a mildly controversial call that history will forget because A) it was more than one play before the decisive play (people tend to have a short memory for these things), and B) the Patriots won, so who cares.After Lynch ran 4 yards to set up second-and-goal at the 1, most people expected the Patriots to call a timeout. After all, there was a million percent chance that Beast Mode was going to score, so why not save as much time on the clock as possible?Yet the Pats let the clock run, as if head coach Bill Belichick psychically knew the Seahawks would muck it up.Of course, normally, the leading team wants to shorten the game to give its opponent the fewest number of opportunities to catch up as possible.In this case, however, the Seahawks were going to get three shots at the end zone regardless.That isn’t to say there is no benefit to letting the clock wind down. As already discussed, leaving only 26 seconds doesn’t leave Seattle enough time to attempt three rushes (which we’re stipulating are better plays for them).So, when the Patriots had to decide whether to call a timeout, there were essentially three paths to victory for them:Seattle turns the ball over on either second or third down. Letting the clock run slightly increases the chances of this, assuming the odds of a turnover are higher on a pass than a run (we’ll take it as about 2.5 percent combined instead of 2 percent).Seattle fails to score on all three plays. Again, leaving the Seahawks a little less time probably increases the chances of this happening because it forces them to pass at least once. And we’ve seen how that worked out.Seattle scores. New England gets the ball back and then goes on to win the game (most likely by kicking a field goal and then winning in overtime).But the smaller amount of time the Patriots would have under scenario No. 3 easily dwarfs the other considerations. Belichick should have called a timeout. Here’s how the math looks under some assumptions that are fairly charitable to Belichick:Note again that if we take the assumptions that are most unfavorable to Carroll, his mistake would have cost Seattle only 0.3 percentage points, while under the assumptions most favorable to Belichick, his error cost the Patriots 2.1 percent.4And that’s not even counting the possibility that the Patriots may have avoided this whole situation if they had intentionally missed the extra point one drive earlier, therefore not encouraging the Seahawks to go for a touchdown.But winning erases all sins. read more

The Pistons Are Far From Perfect But They Could Make Noise In

Reggie Jackson feeding Blake Griffin in the post (via @BleacherReport) pic.twitter.com/yx5tmzqwuK— The Render (@TheRenderNBA) February 1, 2019The team has to use an array of handoffs and screens, both on and off the ball, to convince defenders to move and to free up jump-shooters.4The team’s lineups lack two-way balance. So despite Bruce Brown’s valuable defensive contributions, his inability to shoot allows defenders to ignore him along the perimeter, making it tougher to find someone like Luke Kennard or Wayne Ellington. No team scores fewer fast-break points per night than Detroit, and the Pistons are less efficient after forcing a turnover on D than any other NBA club.If there’s been a surprise during the team’s stretch of solid play, it’s that Detroit has shot so well in the aftermath of trading its best shooter, Reggie Bullock — a deal that initially looked suspect and suggested to many that the Pistons were trying to dodge paying the luxury tax. (Signing perimeter threat Wayne Ellington obviously made up for much of that.)But there’s a strong argument to be made that speedy backup guard Ish Smith has been the catalyst in the turnaround. The Pistons were terrible in the time he missed earlier in the season with an injury but looked competent again once he rejoined the lineup. (With Smith out, the only other point guard Detroit had outside of Jackson was 37-year-old Jose Calderon.)Heading into Wednesday night’s games, only four players5Charlotte’s Tony Parker, Golden State’s Alfonzo McKinnie, Utah’s Georges Niang and Boston’s Semi Ojeleye. had helped boost their teams’ winning percentages more than Smith,6Only counting players who’d appeared in at least 30 games while also missing at least 10. according to the Elias Sports Bureau. The Pistons have logged a 21-13 record with Smith (61.8 percent) and an 8-18 mark (30.8 percent) without him.Buying stock in the Pistons feels risky because of their shallow depth and their cold spells that feel like arctic blasts straight from Canada. This 11-game stretch hasn’t been tough, featuring just two wins over teams that would make the playoffs if the season ended today.Still, Detroit owns an 87 percent playoff probability and a favorable remaining schedule — far easier than that of Brooklyn, Charlotte or Miami.7But slightly tougher than Orlando’s. The Pistons’ defense has been solid all year (Drummond is among the league leaders in steals), and the club limits opponents to a league-low 33.7 percent from the 3-point line.There’s a bizarre universe in which the Pistons could reach the playoffs at below .500 and still be favored in the first round. If the Pistons land at the No. 6 seed, and the Pacers minus star Victor Oladipo hold on to the No. 3, not only would Detroit have the top player in the series, but it would also have a real chance to advance to the second round.Beggars can’t be choosers, and those might be high hopes for now. But for a capped-out franchise that hasn’t reached the second round since 2008, the mere dream itself almost feels like a noteworthy accomplishment.Check out our latest NBA predictions. There’s a natural tendency in the NBA to lavish attention on teams that, with every bad loss, send social media into a tizzy because of what it might mean for the league’s landscape. For instance, if the LeBron-led Lakers don’t reach the postseason — a 80 percent probability at this point — it would seem a foregone conclusion that major changes would take place in L.A. this summer.On the other extreme, then, are the Pistons. Detroit, which has been to the NBA playoffs once in the past nine seasons, desperately craves a postseason berth. But if the Pistons don’t make it, there won’t be headlines in national news outlets criticizing them for it. And even if there were, it would be tough to make big changes within an organization that has a first-year head coach and a top-heavy roster. This is their team for now.The Pistons are clearly an imperfect club. But they can bolster their fortunes by simply continuing to play the way they have in recent weeks, winning eight of their past 11 games. Through Feb. 1, the sputtering Pistons’ offense ranked 29th out of the league’s 30 teams in both effective field goal rate and true shooting percentage. Since Feb. 2, though, the club has jumped into the top five leaguewide in both categories.Unlike earlier stretches in the season, when All-Star forward Blake Griffin was carrying the offense, the Pistons have enjoyed a far more balanced approach over the past month. The team’s share of one-on-one plays — which was the NBA’s second-highest through Feb. 11Behind Houston. — ranked just 12th over the past month of action, according to stat-tracking database Second Spectrum.After coming into the season showing off a jumper that wasn’t quite game-ready, two-time All-Star Andre Drummond has looked better than ever simply by getting back to the basics near the rim. He’s averaging more than 22 points and 17 boards2He’s leading the NBA again in rebounding. over his past seven games and has found considerable success with a nifty little push shot from about 8 feet out. Beyond that, maddeningly inconsistent guard Reggie Jackson has been consistently good for a month now and is shooting a career-best 36 percent from deep.All of this is noteworthy for an offense that sometimes shoots as if the object of the sport is to bruise the backboard with repeated misfires. On Wednesday in San Antonio, for instance, Detroit bricked 14 of its first 15 shots to begin the second quarter. Coach Dwane Casey has acknowledged that the iso-heavy games prior to February were largely a necessity: Griffin trying to break down an entire defense — or simply trying to post up — was often Detroit’s best hope.3With Griffin and others often standing around waiting for things to happen on offense, the Pistons rank third in the NBA in three-second violations. read more

Football and basketball punishments differ drastically in Ohio State selfreported NCAA violations

Former five-star prospect and now-Penn State defensive end Micah Parsons (left) poses for a photo with former Ohio State running back Eddie George (right) at the set of College GameDay on Sept. 9. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorOne football recruit and a group of three men’s basketball recruits went on their official visits to Ohio State and took trips to the set of College GameDay before the football team’s game against Oklahoma on Sept. 9. Both parties walked onto the stage of College GameDay and met with former Ohio State quarterback and ESPN analyst Kirk Herbstreit, former Ohio State running back and celebrity guest picker Eddie George and two other ESPN analysts. The visits, it turns out, weren’t permitted, and Ohio State ended up self-reporting three NCAA violations for reach program.But the Ohio State football program issued a much harsher self-imposed punishment from the university than the basketball program, despite the exact same violations occurring at the same location on the same day. As part of its self-imposed punishment, the football program agreed to end its recruitment of former five-star defensive end and now-Penn State freshman Micah Parsons, who was declared ineligible to compete for Ohio State, while issuing a one-game suspension to the football recruiting assistant — Ed Terwilliger — who brought Parsons to the stage. The NCAA agreed with the action and decided no further action should be taken.However, Ohio State did not give its men’s basketball program nearly as harsh of a punishment. In fact, it’s possible two of the prospects have already signed with the Buckeyes for next season. The self-imposed punishments were not harsh enough for the NCAA, which added three additional sanctions including one that made the three recruits temporarily ineligible and required Ohio State to apply for reinstatement in order them to play for the Buckeyes. Both Cleveland.com and 247Sports reported three basketball prospects visited Ohio State that weekend: Elijah Weaver, Luther Muhammad and Jaedon LeDee. Muhammad and Ledee have since signed letters of commitment with Ohio State and will join the program in the fall. The two were seen at St. John Arena that day and tweeted about their visits during that weekend.LeDee committed on Sept. 19 while Muhammad joined him on Sept. 22. The violation was not reported until Nov. 16. Ohio State was unwilling to confirm whether Weaver, Muhammad and LeDee were the three prospects in the violation.Despite committing the same NCAA infractions, the basketball program continued its recruitment of the three basketball players and did not suspend the staff member — director of player development Scoonie Penn — who allowed the prospects to walk onto the stage and set area. Instead, the program was forbidden from returning to the set of any future College GameDay sets over the remainder of the 2017-18 school year and letters of education regarding the violation of the bylaws were sent to both the basketball program and the producers and analysts of GameDay, according to the report obtained by The Lantern.As noted, the NCAA did not agree with Ohio State’s action and decided to impose three additional penalties, according to Ohio State’s compliance department.It declared the three prospects ineligible, requiring Ohio State to apply for reinstatement for the student-athletes involved in the violation from the NCAA Student-Athlete Reinstatement staff. This specific sanction matches what Ohio State self-imposed in its punishment of the football program.Eddie George, Lee Corso & Kirk Herbstreit make their game predictions on the ESPN College GameDay broadcast during the 2017 Ohio State- Oklahoma game on Sep. 9. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorThe NCAA also issued a reduction of “two recruiting person days” and forced Penn to sit out one game. The Lantern reached out to the NCAA for comment about the current eligibility status of the basketball recruits, but did not receive a response in time for publication. David Ridpath, an Ohio University professor and former compliance director at Marshall, said he expects the two players to be reinstated quickly and that the process is more of a formality than anything else. He cited his own personal experience, where at Marshall, the program self-reported a violation in the morning, had the player ineligible, contacted the NCAA and had the player reinstated before the end of the day.“If it’s something very minor and I look at this as pretty innocuous with the basketball players, it can happen relatively quick,” Ridpath said. “But I’d be stunned if it’s not done in a little while, but certainly it would be done by the season and they don’t really have anything to worry about.”The main difference between the punishment for the football program and that of the men’s basketball program is neither the university’s compliance department nor the NCAA told the program it could not recruit any of the three basketball players. This calls into question how Ohio State decided to determine the self-imposed punishments and why they differed so drastically. Ohio State did not comment on the discrepancy in the the self-imposed punishments.After learning of the self-imposed punishment on Ohio State’s football program, Parsons’ father, Terrance, told The Lantern that he believed the recruitment of his son ended because of a tweet his son had sent out after the Oklahoma game that then-redshirt freshman quarterback Dwayne Haskins should replace then-redshirt senior J.T. Barrett.Parsons said he and his son were supposed to meet head coach Urban Meyer the next day, but did not see him and were not contacted by Ohio State after the Oklahoma game except for a brief exchange with Meyer. He said no one ever notified him of the violation, which Ohio State reported on Sept. 26.The idea of Ohio State using this to smoothen the ending of the recruitment is not far-fetched to Ridpath. He said that if a program decided it no longer wanted to pursue a player, an NCAA violation would be a convenient excuse to tell the recruit that they can’t be recruited anymore because of a violation. Lee Corso and Kirk Herbstreit react to being served a ‘Thurmanator’ from The Thurman Cafe in Columbus during the ESPN College GameDay broadcast for the 2017 OSU- Oklahoma game on Sep. 9. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo Editor“I think Mr. Parsons is spot-on correct,” Ridpath said. “Is that nefarious of Ohio State? Not really. They’re playing the game and they’re playing it pretty effectively to be honest with you.”In both instances, the same three NCAA bylaws were broken.Though it was not a violation to meet with the former Buckeyes, it was a violation for all recruits to meet with other members of the media during an official visit. The contact broke two NCAA bylaws that state members of the media may not be present during a school’s recruiting contact with the prospect. In both cases, the prospects entered the stage and set area, which is not accessible to the general public, which broke the third NCAA bylaw.Both Ridpath and Don Jackson — an attorney from Montgomery, Alabama, with experience representing college athletes — said they believe the punishment for Micah Parsons was excessive, given the type of violation. Jackson called it an “awfully serious sanction for this violation.”Ohio State reported the football program’s violations in September, but did not report the basketball program’s violations until November. Jackson said because Ohio State self-imposed a much more severe punishment on the football program before and set a precedent for a harsh penalty, the sanctions self-imposed by the basketball program did not appear to be enough in the eyes of the NCAA.“Had they self-reported the offenses or the violations and self-imposed the less-severe sanctions, it’s quite possible that the NCAA might have accepted that,” Jackson said. “Unless there was some degree of intentional conduct or a past history of compliance issues in a particular program, this was not a significant violation.”Terrance Parsons declined to comment on the matter, saying he just wanted to put the whole incident behind him and his family.“Well I think it’s important to say, I don’t think Ohio State’s done anything bad or wrong here,” Ridpath said. “They’ve done the reporting and there’s two different results really because of the way they reported it and I think they have to be honest that Micah Parsons wasn’t part of their plans anymore. These three basketball players — even though one wasn’t — obviously [were].”Correction: Don Jackson was misidentified as “Brown” on second reference instead of “Jackson” on three occasions. He also was incorrectly quoted in the story as saying “awful” instead of “awfully.” The Lantern regrets and apologizes for this error. read more

Stomach problems dont let Lovren train

first_imgThe Croatian defender knows Liverpool aren’t happy after he returned from the World Cup with this bizarre injuryDefending the colors of your national team is all a professional footballer can dream for.And giving it all for your flag sometimes is literal for them.That’s why, after returning from the World Cup, Croatian defender Dejan Lovren is showing signs of what the competition cost to his body.The 29-year-old player has not been able to take part in the preparations of his club for the new season.“When did I start to feel it? I felt it during the World Cup. I played with pain and those three games killed me. But who wouldn’t play for Croatia at such a big tournament!” he told Goal.comRoberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.“After the World Cup finished, the pain increased. I can’t even sit in my car without feeling it and to get out of the car hurts like hell!”Nonetheless, the Croatian is happy for what he had to give up to be able to take his team to their first World Cup final ever.“I’d always grit my teeth and play for Croatia, but now I am paying the price. But no price is too high for what we achieved in Russia,” he said.But the problem now is that he hasn’t been able to train at all with The Reds.“I haven’t trained since I returned from holiday. I can’t,” he commented.“I hoped it would pass during my holiday, but it didn’t. As I went for a swim, it hurt. I couldn’t even rest normally.”last_img read more