Applying the Principles of The On-Demand Economy to Technology Consumption

first_imgA peek into how Dell Technologies is helping customers win with innovative everything-as-a-service offerings It is undeniable that we live in exciting times. We are in an economy where we strive to own less, share more, and only pay for what we use. This minimalist movement is called the on-demand economy. Why is this economy trend so ubiquitous, and what is its relevance to technology? Imagine consuming technology like you would an Airbnb package, a ride-share service, or a fitness app.The underlying principles of the on-demand economy are flexibility, heavy reliance on technology, and customization to suit each business and its users. By 2020, 40% of IT infrastructure hardware and software purchases will be based on subscription OpEx models (consumption models), public cloud, 3rd party private cloud, subscription-based on-premises infrastructure SW and HW provided on a pay-as-you-go basis, according to IDC.[1]At Dell Technologies, it’s in our DNA to democratize technology. We were applying the tenets of the sharing economy long before it existed! You may be familiar with leasing and financing to preserve cash, but there’s more to financing than that. Some of the largest, most cash-rich customers choose to finance their technology with Dell’s Financial Services organization (DFS) because they know about the exponential value our solutions deliver.Established in 1997, DFS delivers value at every step of the customer experience. The solutions ease budget constraints, increase operational efficiency, simplify budgeting and payments, and accelerate ROI and Innovation. We enable our customers to thrive in a multi-cloud environment and harness the power of infrastructure and applications alike. Our consumption models have the most expansive channel coverage and choice of leveraging services through Dell Technologies services or DFS. Our services are customizable to the customers’ workloads, use- cases, and utilization scenarios.Voted the best Finance/Support service provider of the year by ITEuropa, our everything-as-a-service model and solutions solve business-critical problems by:Making pricing predictable: PCaaS combines hardware, software, lifecycle services, and financing into a predictable price per seat per monthLowering the cost of computing: Fair Market Value Lease encourages regular technology upgrades and reduces the total cost of computingManaging cash flow by spreading payments over time through Financial Lease, Loan, and Dell Business Credit*Delivering the flexibility to pay as you use and need technology with Pay-as-you-grow models, Flex on Demand and Data Center Utility solutionsFinancing software, including service & maintenance: with our Transformational License Agreement (TLA) and Flexible Software Payments we make acquiring and managing software more flexible.Our thoughtfully designed services have a positive impact on minority communities, partner ecosystem, and entrepreneurs through:Minority financing partnerships* – For customers seeking a Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) or Historically Underutilized Business (HUB) lessor, DFS can help facilitate financing through a strategic relationship with Pharos Financial Services, L.P. Minority financing programs improve the economic conditions of communities and allow companies to develop a more diverse supplier network.Channel partners programs – DFS solutions are available through channel partners. Partners that use DFS grow twice as fast as those who don’t.Dell Technologies Capital and SMB initiatives – DFS helps the portfolio of companies in DTC and Small and Medium Businesses by simplifying how they do business with their customers and ensuring steady cash flow.A sustainable approach to asset disposition: DFS resells the vast majority of equipment returned at end-of-lease. For obsolete equipment, DFS works with a partner to dispose of the equipment in an environmentally conscious manner that meets Dell compliance standards.Today, businesses are trying to make the most out of emerging technologies like IoT, 5G, AI/ML, and others. To them, everything-as-a-service (XaaS) is a strategic and operational blueprint. Deloitte Insight says that within the next 18–24 months, XaaS will likely begin disrupting business and operational models, and redefining the fundamental goals of digital transformation.To surmount the odds in this journey choose a reliable partner. A partner who shares your vision, is a market leader, and has a multi-vendor approach to doing business.[1] IDC Futurescape: WW DC 2018 Predictions Nov 2017 Doc#US43152417*Solutions are available only in the US.last_img read more

Brazil to Test Border Surveillance During Military Operations

first_imgThe Brazilian Military is preparing to subect Project Sisfron (Comprehensive Border Surveillance System) to its first test. In June, the Armed Forces will deploy the system as part of Operation Ágata. Soldiers installed the system in the Southern Mato Grosso do Sul region under the auspices of the 4th Mechanized Cavalry Brigade in Dourados, a city in Mato Grosso do Sul. This will be the ninth edition of the operation, coordinated by the Armed Forces Joint Chiefs of Staff (EMCFA). The Military carries out the initiative at strategic points along Brazil’s borders as part of the country’s strategy to prevent crimes such as drug trafficking, smuggling, weapons trafficking, environmental crimes, immigration, and illegal prospecting. Brazil’s Army Project Office (EPEx), created in 2012, evaluates, proposes, coordinates, and integrates efforts toward the realization of the Army’s large-scale, technologically and financially complex strategic projects. So far, those projects have included Guarani, Cyber Defense, Air Defense, Proteger, Astros 2020, and Sisfron. By Dialogo May 12, 2015 Brazil’s Army Project Office (EPEx), created in 2012, evaluates, proposes, coordinates, and integrates efforts toward the realization of the Army’s large-scale, technologically and financially complex strategic projects. So far, those projects have included Guarani, Cyber Defense, Air Defense, Proteger, Astros 2020, and Sisfron. Sisfron is one of seven Brazilian Army strategic projects and consists of an integrated system of sensors to be used to strengthen the government’s presence and readiness along the border. To deploy Sisfron, the Armed Forces will install a comprehensive set of technological resources in the border region; the sensors will provide crucial information to Military commanders. Project solidifies its pilot phase and acquires drones “This will be our first chance to verify the system functions. We are going to test whether the data is transmitted satisfactorily, so we can make any necessary adjustments,” said Sisfron supervisor, Colonel Ary Pelegrino Filho. Military authorities expect the pilot phase will end in 2016. Since Sisfron’s creation in 2013, the government has invested approximately 1.3 billion Brazilian reals ($430 million) in the initiative, which is nearly 11 percent of the overall project budget. “We have delivered 100 percent of the action support subsystem for the pilot project and 50 percent of the requirements for the sensor system,” Col. Pelegrino said. “As for the engineering work, we can safely say that it is almost 70 percent complete.” These subsystems are in the integration phase, which is why they will be tested during Operation Ágata. “This will be our first chance to verify the system functions. We are going to test whether the data is transmitted satisfactorily, so we can make any necessary adjustments,” said Sisfron supervisor, Colonel Ary Pelegrino Filho. The Brazilian Military is preparing to subect Project Sisfron (Comprehensive Border Surveillance System) to its first test. In June, the Armed Forces will deploy the system as part of Operation Ágata. Soldiers installed the system in the Southern Mato Grosso do Sul region under the auspices of the 4th Mechanized Cavalry Brigade in Dourados, a city in Mato Grosso do Sul. Military authorities expect the pilot phase will end in 2016. Since Sisfron’s creation in 2013, the government has invested approximately 1.3 billion Brazilian reals ($430 million) in the initiative, which is nearly 11 percent of the overall project budget. An investment of 480 million reals ($158 million) is budgeted for 2015 to follow up the installation of the pilot project in the region under the responsibility of the 4th Brigade. Col. Pelegrino stated that a small part of this amount – 40 million reals ($13 million) – already has been received and is being forwarded mainly to the consortium of companies responsible for the integration of the devices installed in Dourados. Project solidifies its pilot phase and acquires drones In the south, Sisfron will be set up in the area under the responsibility of the 15th Mechanized Infantry Brigade in Paraná, a state that borders Paraguay (208 kilometers) and Argentina (293 kilometers). The 4th Mechanized Cavalry Brigade in Dourados is home to the Sisfron pilot project, which began in November 2014. The pilot project is divided into three subsystems. The first is the sensor system and decision-making support, which includes all command equipment, fixed and mobile control equipment, radars, sensors, and data software. The Armed Forces anticipates the Sisfron project will be completed by 2022, and will ultimately cover 17,000 kilometers of Brazil’s borders. The Military plans on cooperating with neighboring countries to reduce crime rates along the borders through partnerships between the Army and the various law enforcement agencies. The Armed Forces anticipates the Sisfron project will be completed by 2022, and will ultimately cover 17,000 kilometers of Brazil’s borders. The Military plans on cooperating with neighboring countries to reduce crime rates along the borders through partnerships between the Army and the various law enforcement agencies. Any military move to keep the nation under surveillance is very important. Very good. This project is important. We have a long border. We are in need of serious articles on social networks.This article shows how seriously servicemembers work and their great importance to our country. There is a strategic way of innovation, science and technology, which is not only strategic for Brazil, but can also be applied to areas of the private sector.Congratulations to the Brazilian Army. Congratulations to the Brazilian Army. This mission is patriotic for guarding our sovereignty. Warm regards to all. The Brazilian government is taking too long to implement this border monitoring project.The government has failed to raise more than $240 billion dollars annually in taxes.Also, the government has fails to create thousands of jobs in Brazilian industries, and the worst is the violence resulting from the weapons and drugs entering across our borders.http://www.derlyemarcelinho.com/ The project is very interesting considering that it’s intended to support the work undertaken by civil public officials working in customs and as police. The have been working “unsuccessfully” in fighting smuggling and embezzlement crimes, as well as drug trafficking and immigration. There has been talk for many years about effective border control using technology. In addition, society needs the integration of federal and related public services and agent training. The project is worth the hope that it leads to good and effective results. Let’s wait and see. Congratulations! To support the expansion, during 2015 the Military will acquire light vehicles, cranes, patrol boats, and individual equipment for service members, which will be supplied to units participating in Sisfron stage two. The plan is for stage two to begin in 2016, with the contracting process beginning in 2015. This will be the ninth edition of the operation, coordinated by the Armed Forces Joint Chiefs of Staff (EMCFA). The Military carries out the initiative at strategic points along Brazil’s borders as part of the country’s strategy to prevent crimes such as drug trafficking, smuggling, weapons trafficking, environmental crimes, immigration, and illegal prospecting. Sisfron is one of seven Brazilian Army strategic projects and consists of an integrated system of sensors to be used to strengthen the government’s presence and readiness along the border. To deploy Sisfron, the Armed Forces will install a comprehensive set of technological resources in the border region; the sensors will provide crucial information to Military commanders. In addition to the progress toward completing the pilot phase, the plans for 2015 include seeking the requests for proposals to provide remote-piloted aircraft which will be used to conduct surveillance in the areas where the sensors will be deployed. In the next phase, the project will be expanded to the northern and southern areas of Brazil. In the north, Sisfron will be used by the 13th Motorized Infantry Brigade and the 17th Jungle Infantry Brigade. The 13th Brigade is located in Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, a state that has a 780-kilometer border with Bolivia. The 17th Brigade is headquartered in Porto Velho, the capital of Rondônia, but it also has units in the state of Acre. Rondônia has a 1,342-kilometer border with Bolivia, while Acre has a 1,430-kilometer border with Peru. The Military is well-deployed to carry out the initiative; most of the units in the 4th Mechanized Cavalry Brigade are stationed along the border with Paraguay, covering almost 600 kilometers in Mato Grosso do Sul. The goal of the Armed Forces is to have the Sisfron pilot project cover that entire length. The third subsystem is composed of engineering works, which include the construction of physical facilities, vehicle garages, and Troop housing, in addition to any retooling necessary to support or use the electronic equipment acquired. “We have delivered 100 percent of the action support subsystem for the pilot project and 50 percent of the requirements for the sensor system,” Col. Pelegrino said. “As for the engineering work, we can safely say that it is almost 70 percent complete.” These subsystems are in the integration phase, which is why they will be tested during Operation Ágata. In addition to the progress toward completing the pilot phase, the plans for 2015 include seeking the requests for proposals to provide remote-piloted aircraft which will be used to conduct surveillance in the areas where the sensors will be deployed. Diálogo is presenting each of the projects, their objectives and challenges, as well as new developments, in a series of weekly reports. This week’s report features Sisfron. The second subsystem is designed to support actions and refers to equipment for individual Soldiers, vehicles, ships, and “anything necessary to allow the Army to take action to contain an adversary,” the Colonel said. The 4th Mechanized Cavalry Brigade in Dourados is home to the Sisfron pilot project, which began in November 2014. The pilot project is divided into three subsystems. The first is the sensor system and decision-making support, which includes all command equipment, fixed and mobile control equipment, radars, sensors, and data software. Sisfron stage two brings the project to Brazil’s north and south The second subsystem is designed to support actions and refers to equipment for individual Soldiers, vehicles, ships, and “anything necessary to allow the Army to take action to contain an adversary,” the Colonel said. The Military is well-deployed to carry out the initiative; most of the units in the 4th Mechanized Cavalry Brigade are stationed along the border with Paraguay, covering almost 600 kilometers in Mato Grosso do Sul. The goal of the Armed Forces is to have the Sisfron pilot project cover that entire length. The third subsystem is composed of engineering works, which include the construction of physical facilities, vehicle garages, and Troop housing, in addition to any retooling necessary to support or use the electronic equipment acquired. Sisfron stage two brings the project to Brazil’s north and south In the south, Sisfron will be set up in the area under the responsibility of the 15th Mechanized Infantry Brigade in Paraná, a state that borders Paraguay (208 kilometers) and Argentina (293 kilometers). In the next phase, the project will be expanded to the northern and southern areas of Brazil. In the north, Sisfron will be used by the 13th Motorized Infantry Brigade and the 17th Jungle Infantry Brigade. The 13th Brigade is located in Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, a state that has a 780-kilometer border with Bolivia. The 17th Brigade is headquartered in Porto Velho, the capital of Rondônia, but it also has units in the state of Acre. Rondônia has a 1,342-kilometer border with Bolivia, while Acre has a 1,430-kilometer border with Peru. Diálogo is presenting each of the projects, their objectives and challenges, as well as new developments, in a series of weekly reports. This week’s report features Sisfron. To support the expansion, during 2015 the Military will acquire light vehicles, cranes, patrol boats, and individual equipment for service members, which will be supplied to units participating in Sisfron stage two. The plan is for stage two to begin in 2016, with the contracting process beginning in 2015. An investment of 480 million reals ($158 million) is budgeted for 2015 to follow up the installation of the pilot project in the region under the responsibility of the 4th Brigade. Col. Pelegrino stated that a small part of this amount – 40 million reals ($13 million) – already has been received and is being forwarded mainly to the consortium of companies responsible for the integration of the devices installed in Dourados. last_img read more

Offshore Renewables Keeping IMCA Busy

first_imgThe International Marine Contractors Association (IMCA) is responding to the growth of involvement by its members in the marine renewable energy sector by releasing two more toolbox talk prompt guidelines before the year-end.IMCA’s Marine Renewable Energy Committee has already produced and published a toolbox talk prompt guideline for a Crew Transfer Vessel (CTV) deckhand during personnel transfers. The second, on CTV/DP vessel operations, is in preparation.The committee is also developing an IMCA presentation covering the requirements for standardised boat landings and gangway landing areas. This will be used by committee members to inform and influence offshore wind farm developers internationally, IMCA said.IMCA’s Technical Adviser – Marine, Captain Andy Goldsmith, said: “IMCA’s Marine Renewable Energy Committee has been busy responding to the needs of our members in this growing sector. The Committee interacts directly with field developers, suppliers and regulators within the offshore renewable energy sector. It ensures that IMCA represents marine contractors in this sector and that its members use existing IMCA Guidance.”Also scheduled for this year is a revised version of ‘Guidance on the transfer of personnel to and from offshore vessels and structures’ (IMCA M202). The committee is also working with G+ to provide appropriate guidance on the use of immersion suits when transferring to and from vessels at sea.As part of its work programme, the committee has issued a safety flash concerning a collision by a vessel with the working platform on a wind turbine.last_img read more