More frequent post treatment monitoring does not improve survival in prostate cancer

first_imgJun 5 2018Prostate cancer patients who were monitored more frequently after treatment did not live significantly longer than patients who were monitored once a year, according to study findings led by a University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher.At the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago, researchers presented findings on Friday, June 1, from an analysis of data from nearly 10,500 prostate cancer patients in the United States from 2005 to 2010. The study’s primary goal was to determine if more frequent monitoring with the prostate-specific antigen test after treatment improved patients’ long-term survival. The researchers found that survival risk was not significantly different for patients who had PSA monitoring every three months compared with patients who had monitoring once a year.Related StoriesAdding immunotherapy after initial treatment improves survival in metastatic NSCLC patientsHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancer”This suggests that for prostate cancer patients, once-a-year monitoring may be enough,” said UNC Lineberger’s Ronald C. Chen, MD, MPH, associate professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology, who was the study’s first author. “This is not a surprising finding because prostate cancer is often a slow-growing disease.”After completing treatment for prostate cancer, patients need routine monitoring to detect a potential recurrence of the cancer and get treated early, Chen said, with the goal of improving long-term survival. For patients who have finished either surgery or radiation, the PSA test is used to check regularly to look for recurrence. However, Chen said guidelines have differed as to how often the test is needed.”If more frequent testing does not help patients live longer, then it can actually harm the patient in terms of the cost of testing, and causing stress and anxiety,” said University of North Carolina School of Medicine’s Ramsankar Basak, PhD, a study co-author. “We hope that results of this study will help change future guidelines on monitoring of prostate cancer patients after treatment.”Source: http://unclineberger.org/news/prostate-cancer-treatment-followuplast_img read more

Presence of new or worsened bedsores associated with lower quality outcomes for

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 31 2018A new study from the University at Buffalo has shown that the presence of new or worsened bedsores is an effective indicator of the quality of care for rehab patients.The study is the first to examine whether this metric is, in fact, is associated with outcome of care in inpatient rehabilitation settings. New or worsened bedsores is a quality metric instituted as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA requires that medical institutions be evaluated on their quality of care.Bedsores, also known as pressure ulcers, cost the U.S. health care system between $9.1 billion and $11.6 billion per year, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the lead federal agency charged with improving the safety and quality of the nation’s health care system.Previous studies have shown an association between the presence of bedsores and a variety of outcomes for patients in acute care hospitals and long-term care facilities. However, the association between pressure injury development and rehabilitation outcomes hasn’t been examined previously.Margaret DiVita, who conducted the research as a doctoral student in epidemiology at UB, is now an associate professor at SUNY Cortland. Using data from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation, she examined the records for nearly 500,000 Medicare patients discharged between January 2013 and September 2014 -; after this mandated measure of quality was implemented. The study was published in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.”We looked at how good a proxy measure of quality the new or worsened pressure ulcer measure was, in particular to see if it was associated with poorer outcomes for rehabilitation patients. We found that it was indeed associated with lower quality outcomes: less gain in function during treatment, and lower likelihood of leaving rehab to go to a community setting,” said Jo Freudenheim, the paper’s senior author and chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health in the UB School of Public Health and Health Professions.Related StoriesSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CT”The focus of this paper is on an important question for the regulation of medical care. How do you measure whether someone is getting good care? In this case we were focused on the inpatient rehab facilities,” Freudenheim said. “We looked at one of the ways that quality is measured as part of the ACA-;whether patients get a new pressure ulcer during their stay or, if they have one already, if it gets worse during their stay.”While outcomes were poorer for those with new or worsened pressure ulcers, more than half of these patients were able to be discharged to a community setting. “A pressure injury prior to admission or greater likelihood of developing worse pressure injury are not appropriate grounds for denial of access to inpatient rehabilitation care,” the researchers write.Compared to the control group, patients with a new or worsened bedsore tended to have a lower change score on the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), a basic indicator of patient disability, and to have, on average, longer rehabilitation stay. In this study, about 1 percent of patients experienced new or worsened bed sores during their rehabilitation stay. ​Source: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2018/08/033.htmllast_img read more

Updated Are old secrets behind Lockheeds new fusion machine

first_img Email The defense firm Lockheed Martin sent tech geeks into a frenzy yesterday when it revealed a few scant details of a “compact fusion reactor” (CFR) that a small team has been working on at the company’s secretive Skunk Works in Palmdale, California. The company says that its innovative method for confining the superhot ionized gas, or plasma, necessary for fusion means that it can make a working reactor 1/10 the size of current efforts, such as the international ITER fusion project under construction in France.Being able to build such a small and presumably cheap reactor would be world-changing—ITER will cost at least $20 billion to build and will only prove the principle, not generate any electricity. But with little real information, no one is prepared to say that Lockheed’s approach is going to spark a revolution. “You can’t conclude anything from this,” says Steven Cowley, director of the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy in Abingdon, U.K. “If it wasn’t Lockheed Martin, you’d say it was probably a bunch of crazies.”The Lockheed team predicts that it will take 5 years to prove the concept for the new reactor. After that, they estimate it would take another 5 years to build a prototype that would produce 100 megawatts (MW) of electricity—enough for a small city—and fit on the back of a truck. A Web page with video on the Lockheed site even talks of powering ships and aircraft with a CFR. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Lockheed statements reveal little about the nature of the reactor. Aviation Week yesterday carried the most detailed account having interviewed the team leader, Thomas McGuire.Fusion seeks to release energy from inside atomic nuclei by getting light nuclei, usually isotopes of hydrogen, to fuse together to form helium. The problem is that nuclei are all positively charged and so repel each other. To get them close enough to fuse it is necessary to heat a plasma—a gas of nuclei and electrons—to more than 100 million degrees Celsius so that the nuclei travel at high enough speeds to fuse when they collide with each other. The challenge in building a fusion reactor is to confine the plasma such that it does not touch the sides of its container, because its temperature would melt any metal. Most reactors, such as tokamaks like ITER, use powerful magnetic fields for confinement.From Lockheed photographs of the CFR, it shows similarities to a magnetic configuration known as a cusp geometry, perhaps one known as a “picket fence.” The images show a series of ring-shaped electromagnets arranged in a row, like curtain rings on a rail. If it is a picket fence, then plasma would be confined along the axis running down the middle of the rings and the electromagnets produce a series of magnetic fields that bulge out toward the central plasma—a series of cusps. The effect of this is that if a charged particle near the axis moves outwards it starts to experience a magnetic field pushing it back. This is gentle at first but the farther the particle strays from the axis, the more strongly it is pushed back toward the center. This makes the confined plasma less prone to instabilities that plague other types of fusion containment.Cusp geometries were first proposed in the 1950s by Harold Grad of New York University but were abandoned because experiments showed such machines would be leaky: Particles could escape through the gaps between one electromagnet and the next. Some cusp ideas have been revived in more recent devices such as the Polywell, which creates a 3D rather than linear cusp geometry. According to Aviation Week, the CFR would use superconductors in its electromagnets—not available to researchers in the 1950s—which would provide stronger magnetic fields and so improve confinement. Lockheed statements refer to combining the best parts of several confinement approaches. Cowley thinks they may also be using a technique called a field-reversed configuration (FRC), in which helical magnetic fields are induced in the plasma so that it confines itself. FRCs again date back to the late 1950s and 1960s but tend to be very short-lived, lasting on the order of a millisecond. “They’re probably trying to create an FRC inside a picket fence,” Cowley speculates.*Update, 17 October, 10:53 a.m.: Three U.S. patent applications filed on 9 October by McGuire reveal more details about the reactor. It does appear to be some sort of cusp geometry device but more complicated than a picket fence. It also appears to have a structure known as a magnetic mirror at either end. This acts as a magnetic plug to stop particles from escaping along the axis of the device.One potential problem with the device that has been pointed out by scientists who have spoken with ScienceInsider is that it appears to have electromagnet coils made from superconductor inside the reaction vessel. If they were in that position in a working fusion reactor, the superconductor would be destroyed by the high-energy neutrons that are a product of fusion reactions. Other designs that use high-temperature superconductors have more than a meter of shielding to protect magnets from neutrons, although researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology believe this could be reduced to as low as 77 centimeters. Even if it was possible to reduce this to 70 cm and such shielding was added to Lockheed’s current design, researchers say it would make the device 18 meters across, not the 7 meters that the company is claiming. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

New US rules on helium sales said to stifle competition

first_imgNew rules on selling off a U.S. government cache of helium aren’t working as planned, a congressional panel learned today. A 2013 law designed to increase competition may actually be stifling it, according to witnesses. The law has also failed to stabilize the market price of a resource that is indispensable for many types of technology and scientific research, scientists say.The Helium Stewardship Act aimed to establish a competitive market for federal helium, which accounts for more than 40% of U.S. supply, by phasing in an auction instead of simply having the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) sell it for a fixed price. But the number of companies buying from the reserve fell last year from eight to four.That drop led Representative Doug Lamborn (R–CO), chair of the energy and mineral resources panel of the Committee on Natural Resources in the U.S. House of Representatives, to declare at today’s hearing that “the first year of the BLM’s implementation [of the law] has been a failure.” But other members drew the opposite conclusion, noting that the portion of gas sold at auction went for a much higher price than BLM set for the rest of last year’s sales. “Why are we upset that the companies that were willing to pay the most for the gas won?” asked subcommittee member Representative Don Beyer (D–VA). Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Helium has unique properties that make it irreplaceable for some applications. For example, helium is the only element that won’t freeze, making liquid helium indispensable for reaching temperatures near absolute zero. That’s key for cooling the magnets of MRI machines and for myriad types of physics research. Starting in the 1960s, the United States accumulated a vast reserve of crude helium—a byproduct of natural gas drilling—storing 1 trillion liters of gas underground in a natural geological formation near Amarillo, Texas. However, in 1996, Congress passed the Helium Privatization Act, which ordered BLM to sell the helium reserve.Those sales proved problematic. The 1996 law instructed BLM to sell the helium at a constant rate and at a price that would recoup the $1.3 billion that the government had spent accumulating it. But that approach was holding down the market price of helium and encouraging waste, concluded a 2010 report from the National Academies’ National Research Council. What’s more, BLM had a mandate to continue the sales only until it had recouped the government’s investment. That would have occurred in September 2013, with roughly 370 billion liters still in the ground.So Congress passed the 2013 act, and last year 10% of BLM’s helium sales were through auction. But the change didn’t broaden the market as hoped.More than a dozen companies sell refined helium. But only four of them have refineries connected to the federal helium reserve. So nonrefiners who buy federal helium must work out a “tolling” deal to get one of the refiners to process it. In the past, BLM had reserved 10% of helium for fixed-price “non-allocated” sales to nonrefiners, four of whom bought helium in 2013. But with that helium now on sale to the highest bidder, two of the refiners bought it all, shutting out the nine nonrefiners at the auction.Refiners were apparently willing to pay a premium to block entry by the nonrefining companies. At auction, the winning bidders paid an average of $5.69 per kiloliter of gas, 52% more than the fixed price for the 90% of the helium that BLM sold to refiners in so-called allocated sales, Anne-Marie Fennell of the Government Accounting Office testified.Whether such a tactic is fair depends on whom you ask. Refiners essentially gamed the system, said David Joyner, president of Air Liquide Helium America Inc. of Houston, Texas, which doesn’t do its own refining. “The auction was set up to fail from the start,” he said. In particular, he said, nonrefiners were effectively discouraged from bidding because BLM has not enforced provisions of the law requiring refiners to set a reasonable price. Joyner wants BLM to maintain the sales for nonrefiners in addition to the auction sales, which Lamborn says is what the law intended.The general manager for global helium at Air Products & Chemicals Inc. in Allentown, Pennsylvania—which bought 78% of the auctioned helium—sees it differently. “The auction last year did exactly what the [2013] act intend, obtain a market price for helium,” said Walter Nelson, whose company also refines helium. Nelson said that if nonrefiners don’t like the price set by refiners they should simply invest in their own refineries. However, experts say that’s unlikely to happen, given that the reserve is likely to close in 6 years.Its closure will likely make a bad situation worse for scientists, says William Halperin, a physicist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Researchers are already being battered by price volatility, he testified. For example, Halperin told ScienceInsider that he pays about $6.50 per liter of liquid helium, whereas some of his colleagues have to pay as much at $40 per liter of liquid helium. Halperin told the committee that he would like to know why the range is so great. Such volatility, he said, is likely to get worse when the federal reserve in Amarillo, Texas, closes: It is the only place in the world where helium can be stockpiled to provide a buffer against supply fluctuations. “This subcommittee should consider possible legislative fixes to keep the helium reserve open beyond 2021,” he testified at the hearing.The next BLM auction is planned for 18 August. According to the law, that auction should account for 20% of BLM sales in 2015.last_img read more

Yellow fever threat is serious but not an emergency WHO says

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email After weeks of growing alarm about the ongoing urban outbreaks of yellow fever in Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, an emergency committee convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) lowered the pitch a little today. It called the outbreak “a serious public health event,” but because the international spread of the disease has slowed and vaccine supplies are recovering, the committee stopped short of declaring it a “public health emergency of international concern” (PHEIC). That label would have given any recommendations from WHO greater power. (The organization has declared a PHEIC four times: for H1N1 influenza, the resurgence of polio, the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, and most recently the Zika virus.)“I think it was the correct decision,” says Duane Gubler, an infectious disease specialist who recently retired from Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore. “However, the threat is there and needs to be recognized, not ignored like we usually do.” Yellow fever is caused by a virus spread by Aedes aegypti, the same mosquito that spreads Zika. Isolated human cases usually occur in or close to the jungle, where monkeys are a reservoir of the pathogen. When the virus gets into the mosquito population of a major city, however, it can cause devastating outbreaks. This happened in December of last year in Luanda, the capital of Angola and home to at least 8 million people. In the country as a whole, 2267 suspected cases of yellow fever have been reported, with at least 293 deaths.center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe “Urban yellow fever is a particularly dangerous and concerning situation because of the possibility of rapid spread,” Bruce Aylward, head of the Outbreaks and Health Emergencies Cluster at WHO, said at a press conference in Geneva, Switzerland, today. Indeed, the outbreak appears to have spread to Kinshasa, another African capital with millions of inhabitants. And travelers infected in Angola have also been reported in Kenya and China.The chair of the WHO emergency committee, Nigerian virologist Oyewale Tomori, said that the affected countries need to make absolutely sure that visitors are vaccinated against the virus. He added that surveillance needs to be intensified, mass vaccinations organized, and risk communication improved.But the crisis has eased a bit. Although an emergency stockpile of 6 million doses of yellow fever vaccine was used up earlier this year in combatting the Angolan outbreak, production is replenishing it, Aylward said. “Currently we expect that by the end of May the stockpile will be about 7 million doses.” Several million more doses should become available in the coming months.Even if the vaccine runs low again, some scientists have argued that current doses could be split to vaccinate two or even five people instead of one each. It is unclear how long protection would persist or even by which factor to divide doses. “Right now there are gaps in the scientific knowledge,” Aylward acknowledged. But Jack Woodall, a retired virologist in London who worked at the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention and WHO, thinks lower doses should be used immediately. “They are always talking about the future and in the meantime the vaccine is getting used up,” he says. “As long as this outbreak drags on, the risk is high.”last_img read more

Video Assassin bugs ambush spiders in their own webs

first_imgAssassin bugs are just as cunning as they sound. The patient hunters stalk their dinners, ambushing unaware aphids and caterpillars before killing them with their beaks—piercing, sucking mouthparts they use to slurp up their target’s insides. But when they turn to another type of prey, a web-weaving spider, they face another challenge: sneaking up on the eight-legged morsels in their own webs. That’s an impressive feat because many spiders use their webs as extensions of their sensory systems. Now, scientists have figured out just how the assassin bugs stay under the radar. The gangly insects slowly grasp strands of web with their foretarsi—the tips of their front legs—and carefully pull them away from each other until they break, as shown in the video above. They then gently release the ends to minimize any telltale vibrations. By doing this, they can slice their way through the web, completely undetected, in a direct path to their prey. To measure the vibrations caused by this maneuver without touching the web, scientists used laser vibrometry, as they report today in Royal Society Open Science. Their measurements showed that the assassin bugs’ vibrations were virtually undetectable—revealing how these insects earned their name.last_img read more

Blood test could predict recovery time after concussions

first_imgGill, with concussion physician Jeffrey Bazarian of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in New York, and colleagues took preseason blood samples from more than 600 male and female University of Rochester athletes who participate in contact sports: football, basketball, hockey, and lacrosse. In it, they measured levels of tau, a protein linked to traumatic brain injury and Alzheimer’s disease, which has been found to be elevated in the blood of Olympic boxers and concussed ice hockey players. Then, in the 46 collegiate players who sustained concussions during the season, the researchers measured tau in the blood again—as they did in 37 uninjured, control athletes—at multiple time points: within 6 hours of the injury, and 1, 3, and 7 days later. (The concussions were witnessed by on-field, certified athletic trainers. The players’ symptoms also met the definition of concussion in a widely used test that evaluates symptoms like memory and balance.) Twenty-one nonathlete controls also had additional blood drawn and measured for tau, before the season.Tau is so scarce in blood that it is notoriously difficult to measure. “It’s like looking for a couple grains of sand in an Olympic size swimming pool,” Gill says. So the researchers turned to a machine made by Quanterix of Lexington, Massachusetts, that uses magnetic beads coated by an antibody that binds selectively and extremely tightly to the protein in the blood.As a group, the roughly 61% of the concussed athletes who weren’t cleared to return to play for more than 10 days had significantly higher concentrations of tau in their blood at 6, 24, and 72 hours after their injuries than did the players that experts said could return to the field sooner, the team reports today in Neurology. The biggest difference between the two groups was in the bloods taken within 6 hours of the athletes’ injuries.Counterintuitively, in the group of athletes who were cleared to return to play sooner, the average tau level in the blood drawn within 6 hours after injury was actually lower than it was in the baseline, preseason blood draw. Possibly, this is because tau levels are known to rise, independent of injury, with exertion; thus the fall in tau from the preseason level may have reflected the players’ immediate, enforced rest after their injuries.The nonathlete controls had lower levels of tau in their blood than the athletes at baseline, supporting the idea that exercise may lead to naturally higher tau blood levels. Why that may be is unclear, although the blood-brain barrier is thought to become more permeable during exertion; whatever the reason, the finding in the nonathletes will have to be accounted for if a blood test for tau as a measure of concussion severity is to become a reality.The tau measure was also far from infallible. Blood tau levels within 6 hours after injury predicted with only 81% accuracy whether a given player would return to play in 10 days or less. What’s more, tau in the blood is only a proxy for tau in the brain, notes Barry Kosofsky, who directs the pediatric concussion clinic at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City.“The bottom line is they are measuring something in the blood that they hope is reflective of injury to the brain, but the signal may be obscured because it’s an indirect measure,” he says. He nonetheless calls the work “critically important” and says that an objective biomarker would be a “godsend” in his daily practice.One avenue that needs exploring soon, says Gill, is whether other protein markers in the blood rise after concussions. Discovering those, she says, might fill out the picture, bringing that 81% to 100%. Email In athletes who suffered a concussion, a protein in their blood may be able to predict when they can return to action. A new study finds that those who took longer to return to play had higher levels of a protein known as tau in their blood in the 6 hours following the trauma than players who were cleared to return to the field sooner. Tau blood testing isn’t ready for prime time, but experts say that if it pans out it would become an invaluable tool for coaches and physicians alike.Trainers, sports physicians, and neurologists deal with some 3.8 million sports-related concussions in the United States each year. But they still lack an objective medical test to establish whether someone has sustained the injury, and at what point they have recovered enough from one to resume playing. Instead, they are forced to rely on often-nebulous physical signs, and on players’ self-reporting of symptoms. And it’s known that players, keen to get back on the field, often minimize these.“We don’t want a biomarker that just says somebody had a concussion,” says study leader Jessica Gill, a neuroscientist at the National Institute of Nursing Research in Bethesda, Maryland. “We want a biomarker that says who needs to be out of play to recover.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

March for Science responses split down party lines says new Pew survey

first_imgA new survey reveals Americans’ conflicted opinions about the March for Science Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) From New Zealand to Mexico City, Science covered the March for Science as it happened. Overall, responses were split down major party lines. Sixty-eight percent of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents supported the goals of the march, compared with just 25% of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents. And though 61% of Democrats expect the marches to lead to greater public support for science, 60% of Republicans expect they’ll make no difference.When it came to hurting public support for science, 7% of all respondents agreed the march was damaging, compared with 44% who said it would help public support and 44% who said it would make no difference. Among Americans between ages 18 and 29, the majority said the march would help raise support for government funding of science and encourage scientists to be more active in civic affairs. Live updates from the global March for Science Bill Douthitt/Science By Lindzi WesselMay. 12, 2017 , 6:00 PM Email News flash: Citizens of the United States are divided over politics. And that divisive spirit was not shaken by the tens of thousands of people who participated in last month’s March for Science, according to a new Pew research poll. The survey—of about 1000 U.S. adults several weeks after the march—found that 48% supported its goals, 26% opposed them, and 26% “don’t know” their position. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country March for Science responses split down party lines, says new Pew survey The Pew Poll isn’t the last word on the march, however: Many social scientists in the United States braved the rain in Washington, D.C., and across the country to collect information on marcher party affiliations and motivations. But so far, preliminary data from those researchers are consistent with the Pew results.last_img read more

Listen to this killer whale say hello and byebye

first_img By Katie LanginJan. 30, 2018 , 7:01 PM Listen to this killer whale say ‘hello’ and ‘bye-bye’ When it comes to echoing human speech, parrots are the superstars of the animal world—but a killer whale named Wikie may not be far behind. The 14-year-old orca showed off her vocal skills by imitating her trainer’s words, saying things like “Amy” and “bye-bye.” Researchers got her to do this by first training her to obey a hand signal that meant “copy this,” which, for instance, was used to instruct her to copy another orca squirting water into the air. Then, they presented her with sounds she had never heard before—five sounds from other orcas and six phrases spoken by trainers—and asked her to repeat them. In all trials, Wikie responded to the command by uttering something that roughly matched the sound that she was asked to copy, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Sometimes it took as many as 17 tries to get it right, but she got four of them on her first try, including the human phrases “hello” and “one, two, three.” Orcas form tight-knit groups in the wild, each with their own dialect, so scientists think that their ability to learn new sounds may be key to how they communicate and interact with one other.last_img read more

Does a new genetic analysis finally reveal the identity of Jack the

first_imgA historical image of police discovering a Jack the Ripper murder victim By David AdamMar. 15, 2019 , 2:00 PM Does a new genetic analysis finally reveal the identity of Jack the Ripper? Email The new paper lays those out, up to a point. In what Louhelainen and his colleague David Miller, a reproduction and sperm expert at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom, claim is “the most systematic and most advanced genetic analysis to date regarding the Jack the Ripper murders,” they describe extracting and amplifying the DNA from the shawl. The tests compared fragments of mitochondrial DNA—the portion of DNA inherited only from one’s mother—retrieved from the shawl with samples taken from living descendants of Eddowes and Kosminski. The DNA matches that of a living relative of Kosminki, they conclude in the Journal of Forensic Sciences.The analysis also suggests the killer had brown hair and brown eyes, which agrees with the evidence from an eyewitness. “These characteristics are surely not unique,” the authors admit in their paper. But blue eyes are now more common than brown in England, the researchers note.The results are unlikely to satisfy critics. Key details on the specific genetic variants identified and compared between DNA samples are not included in the paper. Instead, the authors represent them in a graphic with a series of colored boxes. Where the boxes overlap, they say, the shawl and modern DNA sequences matched.The authors say in their paper that the Data Protection Act, a U.K. law designed to protect the privacy of individuals, stops them from publishing the genetic sequences of the living relatives of Eddowes and Kosminski. The graphic in the paper, they say, is easier for nonscientists to understand, especially “those interested in true crime.”Walther Parson, a forensic scientist at the Institute of Legal Medicine at Innsbruck Medical University in Austria, says mitochondrial DNA sequences pose no risk to privacy and the authors should have included them in the paper. “Otherwise the reader cannot judge the result. I wonder where science and research are going when we start to avoid showing results but instead present colored boxes.”Hansi Weissensteiner, an expert in mitochondrial DNA also at Innsbruck, also takes issue with the mitochondrial DNA analysis, which he says can only reliably show that people—or two DNA samples—are not related. “Based on mitochondrial DNA one can only exclude a suspect.” In other words, the mitochondrial DNA from the shawl could be from Kosminski, but it could probably also have come from thousands who lived in London at the time.Other critics of the Kosminsky theory have pointed out that there’s no evidence the shawl was ever at the crime scene. It also could have become contaminated over the years, they say.The new tests are not the first attempt to identify Jack the Ripper from DNA. Several years ago, U.S. crime author Patricia Cornwell asked other scientists to analyze any DNA in samples taken from letters supposedly sent by the serial killer to police. Based on that DNA analysis and other clues she said the killer was the painter Walter Sickert, though many experts believe those letters to be fake. Another genetic analysis of the letters claimed the murderer could have been a woman. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Chronicle/Alamy Stock Photo Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Forensic scientists say they have finally fingered the identity of Jack the Ripper, the notorious serial killer who terrorized the streets of London more than a century ago. Genetic tests published this week point to Aaron Kosminski, a 23-year-old Polish barber and a prime police suspect at the time. But critics say the evidence isn’t strong enough to declare this case closed.The results come from a forensic examination of a stained silk shawl that investigators said was found next to the mutilated body of Catherine Eddowes, the killer’s fourth victim, in 1888. The shawl is speckled with what is claimed to be blood and semen, the latter believed to be from the killer. Four other women in London were also murdered in a 3-month spree and the culprit has never been confirmed.This isn’t the first time Kosminski has been linked to the crimes. But it is the first time the supporting DNA evidence has been published in a peer-reviewed journal. The first genetic tests on shawl samples were conducted several years ago by Jari Louhelainen, a biochemist at Liverpool John Moores University in the United Kingdom, but he said he wanted to wait for the fuss to die down before he submitted the results. Author Russell Edwards, who bought the shawl in 2007 and gave it to Louhelainen, used the unpublished results of the tests to identify Kosminski as the murderer in a 2014 book called Naming Jack the Ripper. But geneticists complained at the time that it was impossible to assess the claims because few technical details about the analysis of genetic samples from the shawl were available.last_img read more

R Kellys Lawyer Rips Into Kim Foxx

first_img Jesse Jackson Demands ‘Justice Now’ At EJ Bradford’s Moving Funeral Ceremony Texts messages from State’s Attorney Kim Foxx to staff about two weeks before charges were dropped on Jussie Smollett. Refers to Smollett as a “washed up celeb who lied to cops.” Texts obtained through FOIA request. @cbschicago pic.twitter.com/KWPKQzLQ8h— Charlie De Mar (@CharlieDeMar) April 16, 2019On Jan. 29, while walking to a subway, Smollett claimed two men yelled racial and homophobic slurs at him, investigators told The Hollywood Reporter. They allegedly punched and poured bleach on him while one of the suspects put a rope around his neck. As they fled the scene, Smollett told police they said, “This is MAGA country.” The drama of the Jussie Smollett case continues. After text messages from State Attorney Kim Foxx, R. Kelly’s lawyer is now outraged. Foxx asked the question, “Pedophile with 4 victims 10 counts. Washed up celeb who lied to cops, 16,” which was a reference to the disgraced R&B singer.SEE ALSO: Chicago Police Union Has The Corrupt Nerve To Protest Kim Foxx Over Jussie SmollettTMZ reports his legal team Kelly’s attorney, Steven Greenberg, believes the pedophile comment “was outrageous, considering Kelly hasn’t been convicted of any such crime.”In addition, “Greenberg says Foxx is letting her personal biases color the way she characterizes Kelly’s case.” Greenberg calls the Cook County State Attorney’s Office “dysfunctional and chaotic” and believes Foxx lacks objectivity. Smollett has maintained his innocence from the beginning and all charges were dropped.Kelly was arrested Feb. 23 after surrendering to Chicago police following his indictment on the same day for 10 counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse. After spending the weekend in jail because he arguably had trouble paying the $100,000 for bail, a woman friend of his posted his bond.Kelly was taken into custody again for failing to pay more than $160,000 in child support but was released a few days later after someone else paid his bond. However, he might be going back to jail for once again failing to pay child support.SEE ALSO:Jussie Smollett’s Team Rips Into Rahm Emanuel And Chicago For Threatening To Sue HimOutrageous! Figurines Of White Cherub Crushing Head Of Black Angel Removed From Dollar StoreMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s Clothes Emantic "EJ" Fitzgerald Braford Jr. More By NewsOne Staff Chicago , Jussie Smollett , Kim Foxx A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist His team hasn’t decided if they want Foxx removed from the Kelly case but “once he and his team get everything they need, they’ll make a decision on what to ask as far as Foxx’s involvement is concerned.”CBS Chicago reportedly obtained hundreds of emails and text messages about the investigation through a Freedom of Information Act request. Foxx wrote to her staff, “Sooo……I’m recused, but when people accuse us of overcharging cases…16 counts on a class 4 becomes exhibit A.”She was also disturbed that R. Kelly got less charges than Smollett, “Pedophile with 4 victims 10 counts. Washed up celeb who lied to cops, 16. On a case eligible for deferred prosecution I think it’s indicative of something we should be looking at generally. Just because we can charge something doesn’t mean we should.”See below: Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more

Podcast Mysterious fast radio bursts and longlasting effects of childhood cancer treatments

first_imgESO/L. Calçada Host Sarah Crespi talks with Staff Writer Daniel Clery about the many, many theories surrounding fast radio bursts—extremely fast, intense radio signals from outside the galaxy—and a new telescope coming online that may help sort them out.Also this week, Sarah talks with Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel about her story on researchers’ attempts to tackle the long-term effects of pediatric cancer treatment. The survival rate for some pediatric cancers is as high as 90%, but many survivors have a host of health problems. Jennifer’s feature is part of a special section on pediatric cancer.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download a transcript (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: ESO/L. Calçada; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img read more

Worlds Only Woolly Mammoth Fur Hat Up For Sale

first_imgWoolly mammoths are creatures from our prehistory that are closely related to Asian Elephants. They would have looked a lot like modern elephants, except for having small ears (to protect them from the cold), and being covered in thick, brown hair. Mammoths went extinct about 10,000 years ago, according to Live Science, as a result of the ice age. Scientists know a lot about the mammoth because not only did they go extinct relatively recently, but also because the Arctic permafrost preserved them very well, often leaving their bodies nearly intact.Mural depicting a herd walking near the Somme River in France, by Charles R. Knight, 1916, American Museum of Natural HistoryWhen the ground around the Arctic riverbanks and streams erode, it’s not that unusual to find mammoths that look very close to the way they looked when they were still alive. This phenomenon is how the story begins.Vladimir Ammosov, a 44-year old builder from Russia, is offering the “world’s only” mammoth wool hat for sale, according to the Daily Mail.Mammoth hair and skin, preserved in Siberian ice Photo by Matt Mechtley CC BY SA 2.0The wool came from an animal found in the ice, deep in Siberia, where the mammoth died. Ammosov’s uncle went to a known mammoth graveyard site at Kazachye village, in Yakutia, near where he lived.The uncle collected a large bag of the wool, which he then later sold to Ammosov when he was in need of money.Woolly mammoth model at the Royal BC Museum, Victoria, British Columbia Photo Tracy O CC BY-SA 2.0Ammosov stated that he gave much thought to the question of what to do with the wool. After a while, he decided to make it into a hat.In Yakutia, they make traditional round hats out of horse hair, and he thought that mammoth wool should work just as well. He gave the wool to a local master knitter who crocheted it into a hat in the traditional style.Map of Sakha (Yakutia).The finished hat is described as being rough-textured and prickly. Ammosov is selling this one of a kind hat for $10,000. It comes with a certificate authenticating that the hat is genuinely mammoth wool, which has been attested to by Seymon Grigoryev, the director of Yakutia’s Mammoth Museum.Pleistocene of Northern Spain showing woolly mammoth, cave lions eating a reindeer, tarpans, and woolly rhinoceros.According to the Siberian Times, Grigoryev tried the hat on, saying it was the prickliest hat he had ever worn. He stated that the wool is completely odorless, and felt a bit like he was having a head massage. Ammosov stated that the traditional hats in this style are worn by men for certain special occasions, such as the Yakutian New Year, or the summer solstice.He told the Times, however, that “We believe these hats are worn by men: I think it comes from older times when such hats were worn under warrior’s helmets.” He went to remark that since this is the 21st century, he didn’t see a problem with the hat being worn by a woman or a child.So for $10,000 you can own an object that is made of tens-of-thousands-of-years-old mammoth wool.Ammosov might want to hope that his unique hat sells quickly. Scientists have been working on trying to clone the wooly mammoth. According to Business Insider in February of 2017, a team of Harvard scientists wants to bring it back by combining the DNA of the mammoth with that of an elephant, by using Crispr, a gene editing technology.Read another story from us: The plan to bring Woolly Mammoths back to lifeScientists have been considering the idea since a remarkably well-preserved mammoth was discovered in 2013, which still had blood that could be used to extract DNA. They predict that could succeed by some time in 2019. If they succeed in bringing the mammoth back from extinction, it may severely lower the historical value, and the cost, of Ammosov hat.last_img read more

High Court directs Mohali authorities to hand over property under school management

first_img Advertising In the plea filed through Advocate Vikas Chatrath, it was submitted that the Naib Tehsildar and other officers have to fail to get the property vacated from borrowers despite the court’s order of April 2018.“That since, petitioner bank has already exhausted available remedy for taking over the physical possession of the mortgaged property but in vain. Petitioner bank is left with no other remedy except to approach the Hon’ble Court by way of present writ petition,” said SBI in the plea, adding, that the process for recovery of a huge amount from borrowers has been put to a grinding halt as the authorities have kept the order for handing over possession to the bank in abeyance.The state, in court, submitted that though the date for delivery of actual physical possession was March 25, 2019, because of unavailability of the police force and the recently-concluded Lok Sabha elections, the April 2018 order was not complied with. Cops must get out of mindset of depicting spas as brothels: Madras High Court Punjab & Haryana HC rejects Sangrur man’s plea for DNA test on daughter to avoid paying maintenance By Express News Service |Haryana | Published: July 8, 2019 1:17:26 pm The direction was in accordance with an order passed under the Securitisation and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, in April 2018. The bank authorities had approached the High Court alleging that the district administration had come under pressure of the school management and had failed to implement the High Court’s order.Earlier, the education society had availed a loan of Rs 750 lakh for construction of a school building, for which it created an equitable mortgage in the form of land in question against it. According to the SBI plea in High Court, the school was constructed over the mortgaged property. The loan was declared a non-performing asset (NPA) in 2016 and accordingly, the proceedings for possession of the property were initiated to recover outstanding dues.Caliber Mexico Education Society runs the British School in Patiala’s Banur. While the order was passed in April 2018 by the Mohali Additional District Magistrate for handing over the property to SBI, the bank approached high court earlier this year for implementation of the order. Punjab and Haryana High Court, SBI, Punjab, Punjab news, School Management, Punjab news, Punjab Express line, The Indian Express news The direction was in accordance with an order passed under the Securitisation and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, in April 2018. (File photo)The Punjab and Haryana High Court has directed civil and police authorities of Mohali to deliver physical possession of the mortgaged property of Caliber Mexico Education Society in Banur, Mohali, to State Bank of India within 15 days. Related News Advertising Delhi High Court rejects bail plea of flight attendant Anissia Batra’s husband Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Bill to jail cow vigilantes tabled in Madhya Pradesh Assembly

first_img cow vigilantism bill, Madhya Pradesh, Violence against cow slaughter, Kamal nath, Congress, cow vigilantism bill madhya Pradesh, anti-cow slaughter Act, mob lynching, india news, Indian express According to the Bill, the minimum jail term will be six months and maximum of three years and a fine of Rs 25,000 may be levied in such cases.Congress-ruled Madhya Pradesh on Wednesday became the first state in the country to table a Bill that seeks to curb cow vigilantism by providing stringent punishment, ranging from six months to five years in jail, to those who engage in violence against persons booked for violating Madhya Pradesh Prohibition of Slaughter of Cow Progeny Act. Related News Post Comment(s) Tabled by Animal Husbandry Minister Lakhan Yadav, the Bill seeks to amend the principal Act by introducing jail term and fine, or both, for vigilantes who attack those booked for offences like cow slaughter, possession of beef or transportation of cows for slaughter. According to the Bill, the minimum jail term will be six months and maximum of three years and a fine of Rs 25,000 may be levied in such cases. If the same offence is committed by a mob, the minimum jail term will increase to one year and the maximum to five years and a fine of Rs 50,000 may be levied.Speaking to The Indian Express, BJP MLA Yashpal Singh Sisodiya said, “Why is the government silent on violence against those booked for other crimes. Does the government want to give a clean chit to those involved in illegal transportation (of cattle)?’’. Equally committed to protecting human life, cows: UP CM Yogi Adityanath Jharkhand: Year after lynching, victim’s family struggles to get death certificate Advertising Death of an SHO Written by Milind Ghatwai | Bhopal | Published: July 18, 2019 1:35:39 amlast_img read more

Uttar Pradesh Three undertrials escape after killing 2 police escorts

first_imgWritten by AMIT SHARMA | Meerut | Published: July 18, 2019 3:03:29 am Related News Uttar Pradesh: Pratapgarh SP removed after VHP leader’s murder According to one of the constables, Khoob Singh, who was in the prison van and survived the attack, the three undertrials suddenly snatched the service weapons from constables Harendra Singh and Brijpal and shot them, before escaping with the weapons.Singh told the SP that the criminals were also carrying a country-made pistol and a knife which could have been provided by their relatives at the court.Police said that the three had been planning the escape for the last three days.Police have launched a combing operation in the area to track the fugitives. Advertising Jharkhand court drops ‘donate Quran’ condition for bail to Ranchi woman over offensive post ‘Truth, justice have prevailed’: PM Modi on Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict “We have formed four police teams to trace the undertrials, and sent a separate police party to their village. We are hopeful of arresting the fugitives very soon,” Prasad told The Indian Express over phone.“All the entry and exit points of Sambhal have been sealed, and we have sought details of those who have recently met the undertials in Moradabad jail,” the SP said.The Uttar Pradesh government announced a compensation of Rs 50 lakh each to the next of kin of the deceased constables, besides a government job for a dependent family member and “extraordinary pensions” to their wives, an official spokesman said.Principal Secretary (Home) Arvind Kumar said that the state government has directed the Sambhal SP to take prompt action. ‘Abduction, gangrape’ on Mainpuri Highway: Attempt to murder case against SO, 3 constables center_img The incident took place near Dewakheda village, under Baniyather police station area, when five constables were returning to Moradabad jail in a police van with 24 undertrials after a hearing at a court in Chandausi, police said.“The three prisoners were carrying spice powder and used it against fellow inmates and policemen. After they overpowered the two policemen, it appears that they shot them using their weapons. Further investigation is underway,” Sambhal SP Yamuna Prasad said.The three undertrials have been identified as Kamal Singh, Shakeel and Dharam Pal Singh, all residents of Behjoi village in Bijnor district. They were lodged in Moradabad jail since 2014 and are facing murder charge. Best Of Express Advertising Salve hails verdict, says ICJ protected Jadhav from being executed Gangster, 3 who helped him escape killed: UP cops Uttar pradesh, UP undertrials escape, UP police, UP jailbreak, prisoner escapes, Sambhal undertrials escape, indian express The three undertrials have been identified as Kamal Singh, Shakeel and Dharam Pal Singh, all residents of Behjoi village in Bijnor district. They were lodged in Moradabad jail since 2014 and are facing murder charge.Three undertrials escaped from police custody after gunning down two constables using their service rifles in a police van in Sambhal on Wednesday afternoon. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

New inflammatory biomarker correlates with increased thrombosis risk in cancer patients

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 26 2018Cancer patients are known to have an increased risk of thrombosis. As part of the CATS study, MedUni Vienna researchers have now investigated a correlation between an activated immune system in cancer patients and their risk of thrombosis. It was found that citrullinated histone 3, known as “H3Cit”, a protein released into the blood by specialised immune cells, correlates with an elevated risk of thrombosis. The results of the study have been published in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.Venous thromboembolism – occlusion of venous blood vessels – is a known complication in cancer patients. Cancer patients have an approximately 4 – 7 times higher risk of thromboembolism, depending upon the type, stage and mode of treatment of the tumour. Blood-thinning drugs can be given prophylactically but these are not entirely without risk, since they affect the physiology of blood clotting and increase the risk of bleeds. The researchers believe that, to avoid exposing patients to further unnecessary complications, it would be preferable to be able to predict their individual risk more accurately.Related StoriesBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerLiving with advanced breast cancerNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerA research group, led by biologist Lisa-Marie Mauracher and doctors Johannes Thaler, Cihan Ay and Ingrid Pabinger from the Division of Hematology and Hemastasology at MedUni Vienna’s Department of Medicine I, has now studied the behaviour of a subgroup of white blood cells, neutrophil granulocytes, and their influence upon increased thrombosis risk in cancer patients.Neutrophil granulocytes are part of the immune response and their function is to identify and destroy microorganisms. One of their characteristics is that they release their DNA, which spreads like a net to trap and fight microorganisms. In addition to their role in immune defence, these DNA nets or traps are also involved in the development of thrombosis, since platelets (thrombocytes) get caught in the traps, are activated and can lead to vascular occlusion. Citrullinated histone 3 (H3Cit), a component of DNA traps, released into the blood, is measured to allow a more accurate analysis of the relationship between DNA traps and the development of thrombosis.For the first time, the study has now enabled MedUni Vienna researchers to confirm their initial hypothesis, namely that the H3Cit protein is associated with an elevated risk of thrombosis. Says Mauracher: “This also indicates a correlation between thrombosis and inflammation. This parameter can potentially be used in diagnostic procedures in the future.” Source:https://www.meduniwien.ac.at/web/en/about-us/news/detailsite/2018/news-im-september-2018/new-inflammatory-biomarker-predicts-elevated-thrombosis-risk-in-cancer-patients/last_img read more

Global report highlights how the changing world is affecting childrens physical activity

first_img Source:http://www.cheori.org/ Slovenia obtained the best grades for Overall Physical Activity (A?), Family and Peers (B+), and Government (A), and received an overall average grade of B. A notable feature in Slovenia is the importance of sport for the culture of this almost 30-year old country as “Slovenes tend to view sports as an effective tool in fostering national identity among citizens and making successful global identity claims.” Zimbabwe reports above-average grades in Overall Physical Activity (C+) and Sedentary Behaviours (B). Overall physical activity is mostly affected by active transportation which, for the majority of the children in Zimbabwe, is a necessity in everyday life. Japan had the best grades for Active Transportation (A?) and Physical Fitness (A), and had no grades lower than C?. Japan has a highly established “walking to school practice” that has been implemented since the School Education Act enforcement order, enacted in 1953. It states that public elementary schools should be located within no more than 4 km, and for public junior high schools no more than 6 km from the student’s home. Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 26 2018Children around the world are not moving enough to maintain healthy growth and development, according to a global report released today.The report by the Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance (AHKGA) compared 49 countries from six continents to assess global trends in childhood physical activity in developed and developing nations, resulting in the “Global Matrix 3.0″ comparison of grades.The report revealed that modern lifestyles – increases in screen time, the growing urbanization of communities and the rise in automation of previously manual tasks – are contributing to a pervasive public health problem that must be recognized as a global priority.”Global trends, including excessive screen time, are contributing to a generation of inactive children and putting them on a dangerous path,” said Professor Mark Tremblay, President of the AHKGA, Senior Scientist at the CHEO Research Institute in Canada and Professor at the University of Ottawa. “We have a collective responsibility to change this because inactive children are at risk for adverse physical, mental, social and cognitive health problems. This generation will face a range of challenges, including the impacts of climate change, increasing globalization, and the consequences of rapid technological change. They will need to become habitually physically active in order to grow into healthy, resilient adults who can survive and thrive in a changing world.”The AHKGA international comparison involved 517 experts who produced 49 country report cards, grading 10 common indicators related to the physical activity of children and youth. The resulting report examines global patterns, and highlights how our changing world is affecting children’s physical activity levels. Increases in screen time and a growing reliance on technology are taking up crucial time that could be better spent engaged in a wide range of physical activities; and an increased use of motorized transport is changing physical activity levels globally.”Pushing back against these lifestyle shifts requires social engineering, not just built engineering, and the challenges vary depending on each country’s stage of development,” said Dr. Tremblay. “It will take many facets of society working together to shift behaviours to preserve and promote our children’s right to play and be active. We hope this report will be a call to action for societies around the world.”Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaDaily intake for phosphates in infants, children can exceed health guidance valuesGuidelines to help children develop healthy habits early in lifeLearning from each otherCountries with the most active children and youth overall, including Slovenia, Zimbabwe and Japan, each rely on very different approaches to get kids moving but what is consistent among all of them is that physical activity is driven by pervasive cultural norms. Being active is not just a choice, but a way of life.center_img “There much we can learn from each other to improve the grades around the world,” said Professor Peter Katzmarzyk, AHKGA Vice-President and Associate Executive Director for Population and Public Health Sciences at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. “Physical inactivity is a global concern and can no longer be ignored. For the good of our children’s health and futures, we need to build physical activity into all societies, and change social norms to get kids moving.”last_img read more

Opiod prescriptions for pet dogs misused by their masters

first_img Source:https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2720587 By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDJan 14 2019A new study has shown that Americans are probably increasingly consuming the opioid analgesics that are prescribed for their pet dogs. The research shows that one of the reasons behind rise in the opioid epidemic could be the rise in prescription opioids for dogs. The results of this first of a kind study were published in the latest issue of the journal JAMA Open Network.The researchers have found that over the past few decades there has been a rise in opioid prescriptions for the pet dogs and their owners. They noted that some of these prescriptions opioids are being used by the masters instead of their pets. The team at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet) looked at all the opioid pills and patches that were prescribed and dispensed for pets including dogs (73 percent), cats (23 percent) and other small animals (rabbits, snakes and birds). They looked at four opioids during the study period including tramadol, hydrocodone, codeine tablets, and fentanyl patches. The duration of the survey was between January 2007 and December 2017.Results revealed that number of visits to the vet rose by 13 percent per year but the rise in opioid prescriptions rose by 41 percent per annually. Senior researcher Jeanmarie Perrone, a professor of emergency medicine and the director of medical toxicology at Penn Medicine, in a statement said, “As we are seeing the opioid epidemic press on, we are identifying other avenues of possible human consumption and misuse. Even where the increase in prescribed veterinary opioids is well intended by the veterinarian, it can mean an increased chance of leftover pills being misused later by household members, sold or diverted, or endangering young children through unintentional exposure.”According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United States is presently under the grip of an opioid epidemic. There are over 400,000 deaths due to drug over dosages between 1999 and 2017. Opioid overdose deaths rose six times from 1999 to 2017. Perrone said the exact number of people who are misusing these drugs is not clearly known at present but there is reason enough for concern. She said that there may be unintentional use or misuse among toddlers and teenagers at home and left-over pills may be a reason behind the opioid crisis that has gripped the nation.Related StoriesConcurrent use of benzodiazepine and opioids complicates neonatal abstinence syndromeParental opioid use doubles the risk of suicide attempts by their childrenOpioids are major cause of pregnancy-related deaths in UtahStudy author Dana Clarke, an assistant professor at the Penn vet said, “We found that the increased quantity of opioids prescribed by our hospital was not due to increased patient volume alone… It’s likely our goal of ensuring our patients are pain-free post-operatively, particularly those requiring complex and invasive procedures, has driven our increased prescribing practices during this period.”Perrone said that there needs to be alternative measures including cutting back on opioid prescriptions and also using alternatives such as local anesthetics instead of opioids. She also called for avoidance of long term use of opioids such as hydrocodone for chronic cough etc. Instructions should be provided about storage, opioid alternative drugs and safe disposal of the left-over pills she said.In August, U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb had said in a statement that veterinary-prescribed opioids had a potential “to lead to addiction, abuse and overdose in humans who may divert them for their own use.” He had urged vets to be judicious in prescribing opioids, using alternatives and also educating owners about safe opioid storage and disposal after use. He had urged prescribers to adhere to federal and local prescribing regulations and American Veterinary Medical Association standards.last_img read more

Maintaining an active lifestyle in older age could prevent dementia

first_imgBy Sally Robertson, B.Sc.Jan 18 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)A new study conducted at Rush University Medical Center has found that keeping active in older age may help to maintain memory and thinking skills and reduce the risk of dementia.Tom Wang | ShutterstockIn a study of 454 older individuals (191 with dementia and 263 without), those who were more active than average had better memory and thinking skills than those who were less active than average. This was observed even in participants who displayed physical signs of dementia, such as brain lesions or biomarkers of the disease. Further analysis showed that each standard deviation increase in physical activity was associated with a 31% decreased likelihood of developing dementia. It also showed that each standard deviation increase in motor ability was associated with a 55% decreased likelihood of developing dementia.Post-mortem analysis of the participants’ donated brain tissue showed that this association between increased physical activity and better test scores remained, even after adjustment for brain lesion severity and the presence of biomarkers for Alzheimer’s.”Exercise is an inexpensive way to improve health, and our study shows it may have a protective effect on the brain,” says Buchman.However, it should be noted that the study does not provide evidence of cause and effect, he adds: “It may also be possible that as people lose memory and thinking skills, they reduce their physical activity. More studies are needed to determine if moving more is truly beneficial to the brain.” We measured levels of physical activity in study participants an average of two years prior to their deaths, and then examined their donated brain tissue after death, and found that a more active lifestyle may have a protective effect on the brain.”Dr. Aron Buchman, Lead Author People who moved more had better thinking and memory skills compared to those who were more sedentary and did not move much at all.”Dr. Aron Buchman, Lead Authorcenter_img As recently reported in the journal Neurology, the participants underwent yearly physical exams as well as memory and thinking tests over the course of 20 years.They had agreed to donate their brains for research upon their death, which occurred at an average of 91 years.At an average of two years prior to death, Buchman and team gave each participant a wrist-worn accelerometer that would monitor their physical activity 24 hours a day, including anything from walking around the house to engaging in more vigorous exercise.Analysis of the participants average daily activity scores showed that more daily movement was associated with improved thinking and memory skills, compared with less daily movement.The analysis also showed that participants who demonstrated better motor skills (which aid movement and coordination) scored higher on memory and thinking tests. Sources:Moving More in Old Age May Protect Brain from DementiaPhysical activity, common brain pathologies, and cognition in community-dwelling older adults.last_img read more