Galaxy View 2 specs confirmed − Samsungs ultimate entertainment tablet looks swish

first_img Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editor US network AT&T has confirmed the specs of Samsung’s latest ultimate entertainment tablet, the Galaxy View 2.The specs appeared on a promotional video AT&T posted on YouTube on Wednesday and make it look like a pretty interesting beast.Related: Best tabletThe key selling points are the Galaxy View 2’s gigantic 17.3-inch, 1080p display and Dolby Atmos speakers which the company’s marketing as being bespoke made for movie bingeing.If that wasn’t enough to tempt movie fans regularly on the move, it’ll also have a custom TV Mode. AT&T didn’t give many details what it’ll do, past that it’ll let you switch between live TV and on demand shows and movies while connected to 4G or Wi-Fi networks. As a final perk the Galaxy View 2 also has a pop out kickstand that’ll make it easy to stand the tablet up while watching movies.The only downside is that it’ll have a fairly small 64GB of storage out of the box, which could be eaten up fairly quickly if you plan to download lots of TV series or movies. Thankfully the issue will be easy to fix as you can add a further 400GB using the tablet’s microSD slot.The only other specs revealed in the video are that it’ll have a 12,000mAh battery and USB charge port. CPU and RAM details weren’t disclosed so we can’t sensibly comment how it’ll deal with intensive tasks like 3D gaming and digital painting.Related: Best Android tabletSadly the Galaxy View 2 hasn’t been given a price or release date either, which is a bit of a pain as it looks like an ideal way to catch up on the Marvel movies ahead of the release of Avenger’s Endgame, which we here at Trusted Towers are super excited about.If you’re planning on watching the new Avengers, but need a refresher on what’s happened before then you’ll want to check out our definitive best Marvel movies guide, which will be published later today.Excited about the Samsung Galaxy View 2? Let us know on Twitter @TrustedReviewslast_img read more

Its Your Last Chance to get a Free £5 Argos Voucher with

first_img We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. First and foremost the Fire HD 8 tablet offers a great display — 8-inches of high-definition beauty. Partnered with a ten-hour battery life and 1.3GHz Quad-Core processor, this allows for a smooth, fast experience. And with 1.5GB of RAM, as well as Dolby Audio, stream to your heart’s content, browse the web or keep in touch with loved ones without worrying this device might not be able to keep up. It definitely can.As well as an array of bright colour options and a 2MP camera for both the front and rear-facing camera, the standout feature has to be Alexa hands-free. Put your tablet down across the room and you can summon Alexa to put on some music, or even ask her a question. Functioning as an extension to your Echo system, or even as a standalone, make use of Alexa’s ever-expanding scope and enjoy her assistance without even having to pick up the tablet.It’s also worth noting the storage situation. You can opt between 16GB or 32GB of storage space, but there’s a silver lining. This may seem like a meagre amount of space, especially if you’re snap-happy. But, unlike other tablet devices out there (hey, Apple), you have the option of a MicroSD slot, allowing you up to 400GB of additional storage. Amazon Fire HD 8 Tablet DealsGet a £5 Argos Voucher When You Buy the Amazon Fire HD 8 TabletBringing you Alexa hands-free, as well as an exceptional overall tablet experience, get the Fire 8 tablet for £5 less than its original price point AND get a £5 Argos Voucher to use on your next purchase.Argos|Save £5|£54.99View Deal£54.99|Save £5|Argos This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Dealscenter_img Buy a fantastic gadget and get £5 to spend on your next tech investment? Sign us up! Purchase the Amazon Fire HD 8 Tablet from Argos, and not only can you save £5 on the original price point, but Argos is also giving you a £5 Voucher if you order before tomorrow.Costing £54.99 (as opposed to £59.99), get the tablet that allows you to play games, watch movies and then some. Essentially saving you £10 in the long run, enjoy an amazing storage space lock-in and benefit from the introduction of Alexa to your tablet experience. Amazon Fire HD 8 Tablet DealsGet a £5 Argos Voucher When You Buy the Amazon Fire HD 8 TabletBringing you Alexa hands-free, as well as an exceptional overall tablet experience, get the Fire 8 tablet for £5 less than its original price point AND get a £5 Argos Voucher to use on your next purchase.Argos|Save £5|£54.99View Deal£54.99|Save £5|Argos Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editor If you want the full experience, we’d recommend putting your £5 Argos Voucher towards a Fire tablet accessory. Coming with a stand function, the official tablet case allows you to prop your Fire HD 8 both portrait and landscape. And when using the voucher, it’ll cost you just £17.49 (down from £22.49).A powerful tablet that meets all your needs in one smart device, it’s worth picking up the already discounted Amazon Fire HD 8 Tablet for £54.99 and benefitting from the additional £5 saving on your next Argos purchase.For more amazing offers, follow us @TrustedDealsUKlast_img read more

Tesla brings back free Supercharging to inventory cars and Model 3 to

In order to help move cars during its end of the quarter delivery rush, Tesla is bringing back free unlimited Supercharging to inventory cars and Model 3 vehicles until the end of the month, according to a source familiar with the matter.Tesla has apparently made a lot of inventory cars unmatched to custom orders that the automaker is now trying to move by the end of the quarter. more… Source: Charge Forward

Sleek Xpeng P7 Joins The Chinese EV Scene

first_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 17, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News 9 photos Xpeng P7 will enter the market in 2020 with 600 km (373 miles) of NEDC rangeXpeng Motors unveiled at the 2019 Shanghai Auto Show its second all-electric model, the Xpeng P7, which could be another local competitor to the Tesla Model 3.The four-door coupe will be produced at the Xpeng factory in Zhaoqing and is scheduled for market launch in China in Q2 2020.Xpeng lists several key style points: wide wheelbase (3m), short front overhang, frameless doors, concealed door handles, panoramic windshields. In general, it looks elegant, sleek and modern.Xpeng news Xpeng Motors To Unveil Its Second Electric Car In April .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }More about the P7.“The P7 four-door coupe redefines expectations for a production model in China’s EV marketplace, with its 4s-to-100km/h acceleration, its high onboard intelligence running on the dual-chip SEPA (Smart Electric Platform Architecture) platform, and its elegant design, which combines a coupe’s flair with a 3m wheelbase and generous interior space.”“A second-generation smart car, the P7 is built on the SEPA hardware foundation, which combines the NVIDIA DRIVE Xavier, the world’s most advanced system-on-a-chip (SoC) for autonomous driving, with Qualcomm’s top-of-the-line automotive processor, the Qualcomm SnapdragonTM 820A. This scalable, future-proofed hardware architecture supports Xpeng’s XPILOT 3.0 autonomous driving system, enabling progressive implementation of Level 3 autonomous driving. The XPILOT 3.0 is tailored for China’s road conditions, with features adapted to often congested Chinese cities, cruise control and lane selection for highways, and automatic parking in most-used parking spaces at journey’s end.The P7 offers on-the-road performance and style to match its advanced intelligent features. With a length of 4.9m and a wheelbase of 3m, and dual-motor 4-wheel-drive, the P7 boasts sporty acceleration to 100km/h in 4 seconds, as well as a market-leading NEDC driving range of 600 km+. The sleek organic styling, with a low silhouette and smooth surfaces plus concealed door handles and futuristic lighting, reinforces the coupe design’s spirit of dynamic natural energy. Meanwhile, savvy ergonomic design provides the opulent interior space that Chinese customers desire.The P7’s other advanced features include the fusion–based perception for Xpeng’s user interface (XUI), which interacts with the driver through voice, touch, and even facial cues through emotional recognition, allied to deep learning capabilities that record and learn from drivers’ habits, preferences, and even moods.Designed from the start to fit seamlessly into today’s intelligent connected lifestyle, the P7 also offers ultimate mobile connectivity and Internet integration to coordinate and manage drivers’ work, travel, leisure and entertainment. Xpeng has also developed its own independent APP STORE, creating an open-ended online ecosystem for further upgrade and enhancement.”He Xiaopeng, Xpeng Motors Chairman & CEO, on the unveiling of the P7 said:“Xpeng Motors’ unique differentiation is its vision and corporate DNA. We intend to harness the power of AI, data integration and smart technology to jumpstart the evolution of the auto sector and enable it with ever greater intelligence,”.“Our visually stunning and technologically groundbreaking models like the P7 demonstrate our determination and commitment to accelerate the development of smart mobility.” 18 photoscenter_img On the technical side, P7 will be able to go more than 600 km (373 miles) under the Chinese NEDC test cycle, using undisclosed battery capacity. The dual-motor all-wheel-drive powertrain provides enough power and torque to go 0-100 km/h in 4 seconds.One of the main features of P7 to be autonomous driving tech – currently at Level 3 (more on that in the press release below).The first Xpeng G3 SUV model to reach first 10,000 sales by the end of July and 40,000 by the end of this year. The company intends to have more than retail stores (both self-operated and authorized) by the end of 2019.Xpeng P7 specs:600 km (373 miles) of NEDC rangedual-motor all-wheel drive0-100 km/h (62 mph) in 4 secondsLength of 4.9mWheelbase 3mready for Level 3 autonomous driving Source: Electric Vehicle News XPeng Motors Installs 30 Fast-Charging Stations In One Day XPENG Teases New P7 Electric Coupe Ahead Of Auto Shanghai Debutlast_img read more

Mercedes Concept GLB Might Become An EV SUV

first_img Mercedes GLB Electric Spied: Is This The Upcoming EQ B? Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 18, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News More Mercedes-Benz News The automaker showed the Concept GLB at the Shanghai Auto Show this week, previewing a new compact SUV design based on the front-wheel-drive underpinnings of the new A-Class and CLA four-doors. It will likely arrive next year and rival the likes of the BMW X1 and Volvo XC40, and predominently powered by gasoline and diesel engines.But according to Wards Auto, Mercedes will also introduce plug-in powertrains to the GLB shortly after launch, focusing on an all-electric version as a smaller offering to its upcoming EQC.As well as offering conventional combustion engines, the GLB also is being developed as a battery-electric model due to join Mercedes-Benz’s new EQ electric-vehicle sub-brand badged as the EQB in 2021. Mercedes-Benz Sells First eCitaro With New Big Battery Pack Of 292 kWh This is how spacious and robust a compact car can beWith the Concept GLB at Auto Shanghai (April 18 to 25, 2019), Mercedes-Benz shows what SUV ideas on the company’s compact car platform might be realized alongside the GLA as a sporty all-rounder. While the latter promises engaging driving enjoyment with its coupe-like lines, the Concept GLB places an emphasis on spaciousness with a robust character. The concept car (length/width/height: 182/74/75 in) has space for up to seven occupants, thanks to its long wheelbase (111 in). A number of sturdy features also signals that the Concept GLB feels right at home on rough tracks.“We asked ourselves whether there is still space between the GLA and GLC in our successful SUV range. The Concept GLB is the answer to this question. With it we are demonstrating the creative ideas we have for this segment, too,” says Britta Seeger, Member of the Board of Management of Daimler AG, responsible for Mercedes-Benz Cars Sales. “The Concept GLB is a durable and practical SUV with nonetheless compact dimensions. Whether it is a generous, seven-seater family vehicle or a versatile leisure time companion: we are certain that this concept will be of great interest to our customers.” Customers highly appreciate the varied SUV portfolio of Mercedes-Benz. To date, more than six million customers worldwide have purchased a Mercedes-Benz SUV. In 2018, with more than 820,000 units sold, the SUVs were the strongest segment for Mercedes-Benz.SUV genes brought to the forefront: Exterior designThe Mercedes-Benz Concept GLB has a distinctive presence in the world of compact SUVs thanks to its muscular proportions. The clear, surface- accentuated contours with minimal lines and precise joints convey effortless superiority and modernity. The upright front section with striking MULTIBEAM LED headlamps is clear evidence of off-road genes, as are the short overhangs at the front and rear. The long wheelbase and large greenhouse are key factors providing generous space for up to seven occupants.The muscular and sensuously contoured vehicle shoulder dominates the side view, an effect reinforced by the rising beltline. All-round protective cladding divides the overall proportions and emphasizes the vehicle’s off-road character.The harmonious color concept has exterior paintwork in designo cashmere white magno with high-gloss black parts (e.g. the claddings or integrated roof box) as a contrast, plus discreet orange highlights in the radiator grille and as lettering on the outside mirror housings.The chrome underguard at the front with integral air inlets in a stainless steel look emphasizes the off-road qualities. The rear underguard echoes this theme, creating a balanced overall picture.Extra show car elements: equipped for expeditionsWith a series of distinctive extra elements, the concept vehicle exhibits a particularly robust character. At the front and rear, two shrouds emerge from the roof frame and accommodate LED spotlights acting as ambient lighting and orientation aids when driving off-road.The black roof rails end in a curve at the front and rear. A roof box is mounted on the rear area. The aggressive-tread off-road tires are on robust 17-inch wheels in a two-color design.High-quality finish and very spacious: the interiorThe interior of the Concept GLB reveals its membership of the new Mercedes- Benz compact car family, but as a showcar and SUV it has special leather features and trim elements. For the first time in a compact model by Mercedes- Benz, a third row seat is equipped, with two additional single seats that can be recess-flushed into the load compartment floor to increase load capacity. These seats are far more than emergency seats, and offer comfortable seating for two medium-sized occupants.Making space: flexible seat arrangements in the second and third rowThe backrest of the middle seat row is 40:20:40 split-folding, and can be folded down to create a level load surface. The seat surfaces have a 40:60 division. The second row is fore-and-aft adjustable by 5.5 in – by 3.5 in to the front, to increase luggage space or legroom for occupants right in the rear, and by 2 in to the rear if particularly generous legroom is required in a five-seat configuration. An eight-stage backrest incline adjustment in the second row also facilitates adjustment according to the space or comfort requirements.To facilitate access to the third row, the seats in the second row have an Easy- Entry function: when the unlocking lever on the top outer edge of the backrest is operated, the backrest folds forward and the entire seat can be pushed forward. A total of four child seats can be attached in the second and third seat rows.Contrast in chestnut: exclusive leather and open-pored walnutThe seats, fittings and door panels are partially lined in nappa and nubuk leather, the predominant color tone being “chestnut brown”. Echoing the exterior highlights, there are orange trim strips and seams in a few key places. The center sections of the front seats have two parallel rows of perforations in their woven nubuk leather covers, revealing the orange-colored fabric sub- layer. These extend from the front edge of the seat cushion to the upper edge of the integrated head restraint.The wood trim elements on the dashboard and center console are open-pore walnut. The walnut panels have a chiselled honeycomb pattern that fades out towards the edges. The pedals in the footwell feature decorative inserts in the same material within a high-gloss metal surround, with an identical honeycomb pattern.Dashboard: MBUX and off-road elementsThe basic architecture of the dashboard corresponds to that of the B-Class, with a widescreen cockpit facing the driver and functions and displays controlled via the Mercedes-Benz User Experience – MBUX. New features are the off-road- type tubular elements in milled aluminum, which round off the dashboard at the lower end. These give the dashboard support an impression of robustness, power and a certain factor of fun. Below the three round center elements is the air conditioning control panel with an intentionally analogue look, whose buttons create the impression that they have been milled from a solid aluminum cylinder.The robust character of the interior continues on the center console. Aluminum tubular elements with a brushed structure in a grab-handle look lend solidity to the design of the components and controls. Along the doors, the SUV character is reinforced by the horizontal grab handle, which forms a robust part of the door panel structure as a machined aluminum tube.Powertrain: Four-cylinder turbo with 224 hpThe Concept GLB is powered by the M260 four-cylinder gas engine combined with an 8-speed-DCT dual clutch transmission, with a maximum output of 224 hp and peak torque of 258 lb-ft. The engine block of diecast aluminum with cast iron cylinder liners has CONICSHAPE® technology, which is also known in-house as “trumpet-honing”. To further minimize piston friction and lower fuel consumption, the cylinder bore is widened at the lower end of the cylinder liners. The resulting conical shape resembles the mouth of a trumpet.An innovative low-friction oil and optimized piston rings also reduce friction losses. To take account of the higher specific output, the pistons themselves feature cooling ducts. This also ensures more efficient combustion. The balance shafts for smooth running are located in the lower section of the crankcase. To enhance comfort even further, there is a centrifugal pendulum damper in the powertrain.The aluminum four-valve cylinder head also features CAMTRONIC, a variable valve timing system that allows two-stage adjustment of the valve lift on the intake side of the valve assembly. In the partial-load range, this variable valve lift adjustment allows less air to be fed to the combustion chamber with a smaller valve lift, which leads to lower gas cycle losses. In higher load ranges the system switches to the higher valve lift to achieve the engine’s full power delivery.All-wheel drive as a matter of course: 4MATIC with three selectable characteristic mapsThe Concept GLB is equipped with the permanent all-wheel system, 4MATIC, with variable torque distribution. This sporty all-wheel drive configuration allows the driver to use the DYNAMIC SELECT switch to influence the characteristics of 4MATIC. Three characteristic maps are available to control the all-wheel drive clutch, though the system responds flexibly to the current driving situation in any mode. In regular driving operation, the drive program “Eco/Comfort” is based on an 80:20 distribution (front axle:rear axle), while in “Sport” it is 70:30. In off-road mode the all-wheel drive clutch acts as an inter- axle differential lock, with the basic distribution a balanced 50:50.4MATIC components include the power take-off to the rear axle, which is integrated into the automated dual clutch transmission, and the rear axle differential with an integrated multiplate clutch, which is electro-mechanically operated. Via a crown wheel and a ball ramp, an electric motor exerts an axial force on the clutch pack to open or close the plates. The rear axle differential compensates the different paths/rotational speeds of the rear wheels. The advantages of this control system are above all non-rpm-dependent operation across the entire actuation range, pilot control of the clutch while still stationary and higher efficiency thanks to the ball ramp concept.A look back at Shanghai 2013: world premiere of the Concept GLAThis is not the first time a compact SUV concept has celebrated its world premiere at the Shanghai auto show: On April 18, 2013 the Mercedes-Benz Concept GLA drew public attention. As a sporty, coupe-like evolution of this vehicle class, the showcar pointed a new way in the compact SUV segment. It combined a sporty spirit with the all-round qualities of a robust recreational companion.The multitalented GLA became orderable from the end of November 2013, and deliveries began in March 2014. Since then the GLA has become a major contributor to the success story of the compact Mercedes-Benz models. In 2018 over 609,000 customers worldwide took delivery of their new A or B-Class, their CLA, CLA Shooting Brake or GLA. This means that in 2018, one in four cars sold by Mercedes-Benz was a compact model. At the New York Auto Show, Mercedes made another open commitment to its electrification promises, vowing to EQ-ify pretty much all of its cars, whether it’s a full EV or a plug-in hybrid or a 48-volt mild hybrid system to add performance. An EQB would also likely be joined by full EV versions of its front-drive compacts, such as the A-Class sedans and hatchbacks.Read the full press release on the Mercedes GLB Concept here:Mercedes-Benz Concept GLB Source: Electric Vehicle News 2020 Mercedes-Benz EQC Edition 1886 Revealedlast_img read more

How the battle to avoid relegation unfolded

first_imgHow the battle to avoid relegation unfolded Share on Facebook Share on Pinterest Share via Email Fulham Share on WhatsApp Premier League Share on Twitter Shares00 3.15pmJames Harper ends Reading’s 565-minute wait for a goal with an effort from the edge of the box that puts them 1-0 up against Derby and lifts them out of the relegation zone.How they stand 17 Reading 36pts 18 Fulham 34pts 19 Birmingham 33pts3.32pmDavid Murphy scores to put Birmingham 1-0 ahead at home to Blackburn but they still need an unlikely favour from already-relegated Derby against Reading.How they stand 17 Reading 36pts 18 Birmingham 35pts 19 Fulham 34pts4.09pmRoque Santa Cruz sets up Morten Gamst Pedersen for Blackburn to draw level at 1-1 with Birmingham. Alex McLeish’s team now need both their rivals to lose.How they stand 17 Reading 36pts 18 Fulham 34pts 19 Birmingham 33pts4.19pmDave Kitson taps into an unguarded net thanks to Leroy Lita’s square pass to put Reading 2-0 up and looking set for victory but a Fulham goal at Portsmouth would change all that.How they stand 17 Reading 36pts 18 Fulham 34pts 19 Birmingham 33pts4.33pmCameron Jerome puts Birmingham 2-1 up and a point ahead of Fulham again, but they still need Reading to slip up and that looks unlikely as Kevin Doyle has put them 3-0 ahead.How they stand 17 Reading 36pts 18 Birmingham 35pts 19 Fulham 34pts 4.35pmFulham score. Danny Murphy’s header – unmarked in the penalty box – from Jimmy Bullard’s free-kick hauls them out of the relegation places. Poor Reading: 3-0 up yet still going down on goal difference.How they stand 17 Fulham 36pts 18 Reading 36pts 19 Birmingham 35pts 4.52pmThe whistle goes at Fratton Park and Fulham are safe, despite Reading beating Derby 4-0 and Birmingham’s equally improbable final Premier League scoreline for at least a year – a 4-1 win over Blackburn.Final standings 17 Fulham 36pts18 Reading 36pts19 Birmingham 35pts Sun 11 May 2008 22.50 EDT timelines The Guardian Topics Share via Email Share on Facebook Reuse this content Share on LinkedIn Premier League 2007-08 Premier League First published on Sun 11 May 2008 22.50 EDT Birmingham City Share on Messenger Reading Share on Twitterlast_img read more

Thoughts On Corporate Governance In An Era Of Compliance

first_imgIt’s that time of year when articles go from my “reading stack” to “just read stack.”One such article was “Corporate Governance in an Era of Compliance” by Professor Sean Griffith and recently highlighted on the FCPA Blog.There are several assertions in the article I agree with and indeed I, and others, have highlighted for several years such as: (i) “DPAs/NPAs … have a strong signaling effect on firms not party to the immediate settlement, pushing them to adopt compliance mechanisms similar to those upon their peers”; (ii) “it remains difficult to demonstrate the effectiveness of the compliance function;” (iii) government enforcement actions are often “foisted upon firms through an opaque settlement process, where the government has the whip hand, and the company accedes to its demands …”; (iv) “there is no serious judicial oversight of the [settlement] process” of government enforcement actions; (v) “prosecutors are larding firms with [compliance] cost for uncertain benefit” and that certain compliance mandates “merely amount to a wealth transfer from the firm to the third party [service provider].”Yet, as described in this post, I have a fundamental disagreement with the thesis of the article. In addition, I propose a better solution (to those proposed in the article) to the problems highlighted in the article.The main thesis of “Corporate Governance in an Era of Compliance” appears to be that the “impetus for compliance” comes from the government and that “government interventions in compliance come not through the traditional levers of state corporate or federal securities laws, but rather through prosecutions and regulatory enforcement actions.”Stated differently, the “central argument” of the article is that the “contemporary compliance department is the product of a de facto government mandate that, although felt most strongly by firms in highly regulated industries, has become a market-wide concern.”As further stated in the article:“compliance cannot be explained by reference to traditional governance authorities, whether the board of directors, state corporate law, or federal securities law. Rather compliance is sui generis”“compliance is made by government enforcers – prosecutors and regulatory enforcers – who promulgate de facto corporate governance standards despite possessing neither statutory nor regulatory authority to do so.”As to the origins of compliance, the article asserts that it “has not been led by regulators or legislators enacting amendments to corporate or securities law – the government traditional inroads to corporate affairs” but “rather, compliance has been championed by the government’s enforcement agents.”I have some fundamental disagreements regarding the salient assertions in the article.Starting with state corporate law, the article mentions (as it surely must) a series of Delaware cases (Graham v. Allis Chalmers, In re Caremark and Stone v. Ritter).However, the articles dismisses these judicial opinions as not being a proper source of compliance because they (along with corporate law in general) “provide[] no guidance as to adequacy” and that “as a result, state corporate law has not meaningfully contributed to the development of compliance.” To use the words in the article “whatever compliance may be, it is not the product of corporate law.”My belief is that state corporate law (Delaware in particular) has meaningfully contributed to the development of compliance. The evolution has been as follows.Allis-Chalmer (1963) –  Absent cause for suspicion, there is no duty upon the directors to install and operate a corporate system of espionage to ferret out wrongdoing which they have no reason to suspect it.Caremark (1996 Del. Trial Court Decision) – A director’s obligation includes a duty to attempt in good faith to assure that an adequate corporate information and reporting system exists and a failure to do so, in some circumstances, may give rise to director liability.Stone (2006 – Del. Supreme Court Decision) – Endorsing the Caremark standard and further articulating the necessary conditions for director oversight liability.Just because, as recognized in the article, Stone v. Ritter (as did Caremark) establishes a high hurdle for director oversight liability does not mean that state corporate law has not meaningfully contributed to the development of compliance. (The standard articulated in Stone v. Ritter is it must be shown that directors utterly failed to implement any reporting or information system or control or having implemented such systems or controls, consciously failed to monitor or oversee its operations and further both situations require a showing that the directors knew that they were not discharging their fiduciary obligations)Moreover, just because the Delaware decisions do not provide crystal clear guidance as to the necessary conditions for director oversight liability does not mean that state corporate law has not meaningfully contributed to the development of compliance. Indeed, the lack of crystal clear judicial guidance is true of most legal norms that derive from state common law. Think of the tort of negligence: who owes a duty to another? what is the relevant standard of care? what does causation mean? It depends is often the answer to these questions.The article next turns to federal securities and states that “compliance cannot be understood as an outgrowth of securities regulation.”Missing however from this section is any mention of the FCPA’s internal controls provisions (which are, after all, part of the securities laws).These provisions, which are among the most generic legal provisions one will ever find, require issuers to devise and maintain a system of internal accounting controls sufficient to provide reasonable assurances that transactions are properly authorized, recorded, and accounted for by the issuer.In short, the internal controls provisions, the product of a legislative process, very much contributed to the development of compliance. As stated in a 1977 Senate Report:“The establishment and maintenance of a system of internal controls and accurate books and records are fundamental responsibilities of management.  The expected benefits to be derived from the conscientious discharge of these responsibilities are of basic importance to investors and the maintenance of the integrity of our capital market system.”Although lacking meaningful mention of the FCPA’s internal controls provisions, “Corporate Governance in an Era of Compliance” does rightly acknowledge that “when the government acts through the SEC to regulate corporate governance, it acts subject to important institutional constraints, including the requirement that the Agency perform a persuasive cost-benefit analysis.” According to the article, “when the government intervenes in compliance, it does not act as a regulator and thus is not subject to the constraints of public comment and cost-benefit analysis.”Here again however, the article fails to mention several pieces of SEC guidance relevant to the internal controls provisions that resulted from the regulatory requirements of the time.For instance, in 1979 the SEC published rules concerning the internal controls provisions. In promulgating the rules, the SEC received numerous public comments. (See 44 Fed. Reg. 10, 968 (Feb. 23, 1979). In 1981, the SEC issued additional formal guidance concerning the FCPA’s books and records and internal control provisions.  The guidance was in the form of a speech given by the SEC Chairman that was thereafter adopted as a formal statement of SEC policy. (See SEC Release No. 17500 (Jan. 29, 1981).In short, and as highlighted above, state corporate law and securities regulation (both in terms of express statutory requirements and SEC rules and guidance) have meaningfully contributed to the development of compliance.“Corporate Governance in an Era of Compliance” concludes by proposing two solutions to the problem of “compliance being made by government enforcers – prosecutors and regulatory enforcers – who promulgate de facto corporate governance standards despite possessing neither statutory nor regulatory authority to do so.”The first – “end the government’s role as the architect of compliance, allowing firms to adopt compliance programs (or not) on the basis of efficiency concerns along while still holding them accountable for violations of substantive law.”The second – “increase transparency of the compliance function on an ongoing basis through periodic disclosures in securities law filings.”Regarding the first proposed solution, it must be noted that the FCPA’s internal controls provisions have long recognized (both in terms of statutory language and SEC guidance) that firms have the flexibility to adopt compliance programs (or not) on the basis of efficiency concerns. For instance, the 1981 SEC Guidance states:“The Act does not mandate any particular kind of internal controls system. The test is whether a system, taken as a whole, reasonably meets the statute’s specified objectives. ‘Reasonableness,’ a familiar legal concept, depends on an evaluation of all the facts and circumstances.”[…]“Private sector decisions implementing these statutory objectives are business decisions. And, reasonable business decisions should be afforded deference. This means that the issuer need not always select the best or the most effective control measure. However, the one selected must be reasonable under all the circumstances.”Likewise, in a 1999 SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin ( SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin: No. 99 – Materiality, 17 CFR Part 211 [Release No. SAB 99], Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 99 (Aug. 12, 1999)) the SEC stated:“[Congress] adopted the prudent man qualification [in the FCPA’s books and records and internal control provisions] in order to clarify that the current standard does not connote an unrealistic degree of exactitude or precision.  The concept of reasonableness of necessity contemplates the weighing of a number of relevant factors, including the costs of compliance.”In the same Bulletin, the SEC also cited with approval various aspects of the above-mentioned 1981 formal statement of policy.“As [the SEC] Chairman noted with respect to the internal control provisions of the FCPA, “thousands of dollars ordinarily should not be spent conserving hundreds. […] Because the judgment of [‘reasonableness’ under the accounting provisions] is not mechanical, the [SEC] staff will be inclined to defer to judgments that ‘allow a business, acting in good faith, to comply with the Act’s accounting provisions in an innovative and cost-effective way.”In short, the first proposed solution in “Corporate Governance in an Era of Compliance” already captures the existing statutory and regulatory standard.As to the second proposed solution, the article suggests”increas[ing] transparency of the compliance function on an ongoing basis through periodic disclosures in securities law filings” and then suggests a long list of “mandatory compliance disclosures” such as “how compliance is organized,” “whether and how compliance is involved in strategic business decisions,” “how escalation and reporting structures work, and whether and to what degree compliance influence executive compensation.”Regarding this proposed solution, it must be recognized that it would only cover issuers (a relatively small section of the total number of business organizations subject to corporate governance standards). Moreover, it is a curious suggestion given that other portions of the article argued that it is “difficult to demonstrate the effectiveness of the compliance function.” In other words, what is disclosure of the above-suggested vague topics really going to accomplish other than raising the compliance costs for companies subject to the proposed “mandatory compliance disclosures”?Regarding the second proposed solution, the article asserts that federal securities law, “which forces public companies to disclose a vast amount of information, does not mandate any compliance disclosures.”That is not exactly true.For instance, in 2003, the SEC issued a final rule implementing Section 406 of the Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), which directed the Commission to devise and promulgate requirements for the disclosure of “codes of ethics” by public companies. The final rule defines a “code of ethics” as “written standards that are reasonably designed to deter wrongdoing and to promote,” among other things, “[c]ompliance with applicable governmental laws, rules and regulations.”  The Commission’s final rule requires public companies to disclose their codes of ethics to the public by either (i) filing them as an exhibit to an annual report (on Form 10-K), or (ii) posting them on the company’s website. The final rule also requires that certain types of changes to a company’s code of ethics must be disclosed within four business days of the change where the company elects to disclose its code of ethics on its website.In short, the two solutions proposed in “Corporate Governance in an Era of Compliance” are not the best solutions to the problem of “compliance being made by government enforcers – prosecutors and regulatory enforcers – who promulgate de facto corporate governance standards despite possessing neither statutory nor regulatory authority to do so.”A third solution will be much more effective and it is basic.If a business organization does not want post-enforcement action compliance obligations imposed upon it, assert factual and legal defenses to the enforcement action theories and force the DOJ and/or SEC to prove their case subject to applicable burdens of proof.To state the obvious, if the DOJ or SEC does not prevail, there will be no post-enforcement action compliance obligations.For example, Lindsey Manufacturing was not subject to any post-enforcement action compliance obligations. Rather, it mounted a defense, forced the DOJ to prove its FCPA case, and ultimately prevailed.Likewise, Cobalt was not subject to any post-enforcement action compliance obligations. Rather, when hit with an SEC Wells Notice, it mounted a defense, forced the SEC to prove its FCPA case, and ultimately prevailed.Outside the FCPA context, Vascular Solutions was not subject to any post-enforcement action compliance obligations. Rather, it mounted a defense, forced the DOJ to prove its case, and prevailed.MetLife is not going to be subject to onerous compliance requirements the government sought to impose on its for being a “systemically important” non-bank financial institution under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. Rather, it mounted a defense, forced the government to prove its case, and prevailed.Most recently, FedEx was not subject to any post-enforcement action compliance obligations. Rather, it mounted a defense, forced the DOJ to prove its case, and recently prevailed.In short, the legal and regulatory environment that business organizations find themselves in (including the post-enforcement action compliance obligations imposed on settling companies that “Corporate Governance in an Era of Compliance” rightly notes then often serve as signaling devices to non-parties) are largely the result of excessive risk aversion and the lack of spine business leaders have in standing up to the government.Stated differently, business organizations and their counsel are part of the problem. As to the later, stop to ponder who is the greatest beneficiary of post-enforcement action compliance obligations and reporting requirements?Some might be inclined to respond to this best solution as being impractical because of the collateral consequences of challenging the government. However, in case you haven’t heard the “Arthur Anderson effect” has been debunked as a myth and the government itself has acknowledged that there is a very small chance that a company would be put out of business as a result of actual DOJ criminal charges. As highlighted in this recent post, the “Arthur Anderson effect” should be dead after the FedEx enforcement action.last_img read more

Kirkland and Bracewell Advise on 1 Billion Power Plant Deal

first_img Remember me Username Lost your password? Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.center_img Password Pennsylvania-based Talen Energy Supply announced Monday its plans to acquire Athens, New York-based MACH Gen, which owns and operates three natural gas-fired power plants in New York, Arizona and Massachusetts . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.last_img

Manipulating the World Economy will be also available in Russian German and

first_imgWe are looking at having it Translated into several languages. We hope this English version will be available by October in hardbound. I really hope this will help change the debate for what lies at stake is the future for us, but more so our posterity.Russianманипулируя мировой экономикойGermanManipulation der WeltwirtschaftChinese操縱世界經濟 « Manipulating the World Economy Categories: Products and Services last_img

More frequent post treatment monitoring does not improve survival in prostate cancer

first_imgJun 5 2018Prostate cancer patients who were monitored more frequently after treatment did not live significantly longer than patients who were monitored once a year, according to study findings led by a University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher.At the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago, researchers presented findings on Friday, June 1, from an analysis of data from nearly 10,500 prostate cancer patients in the United States from 2005 to 2010. The study’s primary goal was to determine if more frequent monitoring with the prostate-specific antigen test after treatment improved patients’ long-term survival. The researchers found that survival risk was not significantly different for patients who had PSA monitoring every three months compared with patients who had monitoring once a year.Related StoriesAdding immunotherapy after initial treatment improves survival in metastatic NSCLC patientsHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancer”This suggests that for prostate cancer patients, once-a-year monitoring may be enough,” said UNC Lineberger’s Ronald C. Chen, MD, MPH, associate professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology, who was the study’s first author. “This is not a surprising finding because prostate cancer is often a slow-growing disease.”After completing treatment for prostate cancer, patients need routine monitoring to detect a potential recurrence of the cancer and get treated early, Chen said, with the goal of improving long-term survival. For patients who have finished either surgery or radiation, the PSA test is used to check regularly to look for recurrence. However, Chen said guidelines have differed as to how often the test is needed.”If more frequent testing does not help patients live longer, then it can actually harm the patient in terms of the cost of testing, and causing stress and anxiety,” said University of North Carolina School of Medicine’s Ramsankar Basak, PhD, a study co-author. “We hope that results of this study will help change future guidelines on monitoring of prostate cancer patients after treatment.”Source: http://unclineberger.org/news/prostate-cancer-treatment-followuplast_img read more

Presence of new or worsened bedsores associated with lower quality outcomes for

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 31 2018A new study from the University at Buffalo has shown that the presence of new or worsened bedsores is an effective indicator of the quality of care for rehab patients.The study is the first to examine whether this metric is, in fact, is associated with outcome of care in inpatient rehabilitation settings. New or worsened bedsores is a quality metric instituted as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA requires that medical institutions be evaluated on their quality of care.Bedsores, also known as pressure ulcers, cost the U.S. health care system between $9.1 billion and $11.6 billion per year, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the lead federal agency charged with improving the safety and quality of the nation’s health care system.Previous studies have shown an association between the presence of bedsores and a variety of outcomes for patients in acute care hospitals and long-term care facilities. However, the association between pressure injury development and rehabilitation outcomes hasn’t been examined previously.Margaret DiVita, who conducted the research as a doctoral student in epidemiology at UB, is now an associate professor at SUNY Cortland. Using data from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation, she examined the records for nearly 500,000 Medicare patients discharged between January 2013 and September 2014 -; after this mandated measure of quality was implemented. The study was published in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.”We looked at how good a proxy measure of quality the new or worsened pressure ulcer measure was, in particular to see if it was associated with poorer outcomes for rehabilitation patients. We found that it was indeed associated with lower quality outcomes: less gain in function during treatment, and lower likelihood of leaving rehab to go to a community setting,” said Jo Freudenheim, the paper’s senior author and chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health in the UB School of Public Health and Health Professions.Related StoriesSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CT”The focus of this paper is on an important question for the regulation of medical care. How do you measure whether someone is getting good care? In this case we were focused on the inpatient rehab facilities,” Freudenheim said. “We looked at one of the ways that quality is measured as part of the ACA-;whether patients get a new pressure ulcer during their stay or, if they have one already, if it gets worse during their stay.”While outcomes were poorer for those with new or worsened pressure ulcers, more than half of these patients were able to be discharged to a community setting. “A pressure injury prior to admission or greater likelihood of developing worse pressure injury are not appropriate grounds for denial of access to inpatient rehabilitation care,” the researchers write.Compared to the control group, patients with a new or worsened bedsore tended to have a lower change score on the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), a basic indicator of patient disability, and to have, on average, longer rehabilitation stay. In this study, about 1 percent of patients experienced new or worsened bed sores during their rehabilitation stay. ​Source: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2018/08/033.htmllast_img read more

Updated Are old secrets behind Lockheeds new fusion machine

first_img Email The defense firm Lockheed Martin sent tech geeks into a frenzy yesterday when it revealed a few scant details of a “compact fusion reactor” (CFR) that a small team has been working on at the company’s secretive Skunk Works in Palmdale, California. The company says that its innovative method for confining the superhot ionized gas, or plasma, necessary for fusion means that it can make a working reactor 1/10 the size of current efforts, such as the international ITER fusion project under construction in France.Being able to build such a small and presumably cheap reactor would be world-changing—ITER will cost at least $20 billion to build and will only prove the principle, not generate any electricity. But with little real information, no one is prepared to say that Lockheed’s approach is going to spark a revolution. “You can’t conclude anything from this,” says Steven Cowley, director of the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy in Abingdon, U.K. “If it wasn’t Lockheed Martin, you’d say it was probably a bunch of crazies.”The Lockheed team predicts that it will take 5 years to prove the concept for the new reactor. After that, they estimate it would take another 5 years to build a prototype that would produce 100 megawatts (MW) of electricity—enough for a small city—and fit on the back of a truck. A Web page with video on the Lockheed site even talks of powering ships and aircraft with a CFR. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Lockheed statements reveal little about the nature of the reactor. Aviation Week yesterday carried the most detailed account having interviewed the team leader, Thomas McGuire.Fusion seeks to release energy from inside atomic nuclei by getting light nuclei, usually isotopes of hydrogen, to fuse together to form helium. The problem is that nuclei are all positively charged and so repel each other. To get them close enough to fuse it is necessary to heat a plasma—a gas of nuclei and electrons—to more than 100 million degrees Celsius so that the nuclei travel at high enough speeds to fuse when they collide with each other. The challenge in building a fusion reactor is to confine the plasma such that it does not touch the sides of its container, because its temperature would melt any metal. Most reactors, such as tokamaks like ITER, use powerful magnetic fields for confinement.From Lockheed photographs of the CFR, it shows similarities to a magnetic configuration known as a cusp geometry, perhaps one known as a “picket fence.” The images show a series of ring-shaped electromagnets arranged in a row, like curtain rings on a rail. If it is a picket fence, then plasma would be confined along the axis running down the middle of the rings and the electromagnets produce a series of magnetic fields that bulge out toward the central plasma—a series of cusps. The effect of this is that if a charged particle near the axis moves outwards it starts to experience a magnetic field pushing it back. This is gentle at first but the farther the particle strays from the axis, the more strongly it is pushed back toward the center. This makes the confined plasma less prone to instabilities that plague other types of fusion containment.Cusp geometries were first proposed in the 1950s by Harold Grad of New York University but were abandoned because experiments showed such machines would be leaky: Particles could escape through the gaps between one electromagnet and the next. Some cusp ideas have been revived in more recent devices such as the Polywell, which creates a 3D rather than linear cusp geometry. According to Aviation Week, the CFR would use superconductors in its electromagnets—not available to researchers in the 1950s—which would provide stronger magnetic fields and so improve confinement. Lockheed statements refer to combining the best parts of several confinement approaches. Cowley thinks they may also be using a technique called a field-reversed configuration (FRC), in which helical magnetic fields are induced in the plasma so that it confines itself. FRCs again date back to the late 1950s and 1960s but tend to be very short-lived, lasting on the order of a millisecond. “They’re probably trying to create an FRC inside a picket fence,” Cowley speculates.*Update, 17 October, 10:53 a.m.: Three U.S. patent applications filed on 9 October by McGuire reveal more details about the reactor. It does appear to be some sort of cusp geometry device but more complicated than a picket fence. It also appears to have a structure known as a magnetic mirror at either end. This acts as a magnetic plug to stop particles from escaping along the axis of the device.One potential problem with the device that has been pointed out by scientists who have spoken with ScienceInsider is that it appears to have electromagnet coils made from superconductor inside the reaction vessel. If they were in that position in a working fusion reactor, the superconductor would be destroyed by the high-energy neutrons that are a product of fusion reactions. Other designs that use high-temperature superconductors have more than a meter of shielding to protect magnets from neutrons, although researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology believe this could be reduced to as low as 77 centimeters. Even if it was possible to reduce this to 70 cm and such shielding was added to Lockheed’s current design, researchers say it would make the device 18 meters across, not the 7 meters that the company is claiming. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

New US rules on helium sales said to stifle competition

first_imgNew rules on selling off a U.S. government cache of helium aren’t working as planned, a congressional panel learned today. A 2013 law designed to increase competition may actually be stifling it, according to witnesses. The law has also failed to stabilize the market price of a resource that is indispensable for many types of technology and scientific research, scientists say.The Helium Stewardship Act aimed to establish a competitive market for federal helium, which accounts for more than 40% of U.S. supply, by phasing in an auction instead of simply having the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) sell it for a fixed price. But the number of companies buying from the reserve fell last year from eight to four.That drop led Representative Doug Lamborn (R–CO), chair of the energy and mineral resources panel of the Committee on Natural Resources in the U.S. House of Representatives, to declare at today’s hearing that “the first year of the BLM’s implementation [of the law] has been a failure.” But other members drew the opposite conclusion, noting that the portion of gas sold at auction went for a much higher price than BLM set for the rest of last year’s sales. “Why are we upset that the companies that were willing to pay the most for the gas won?” asked subcommittee member Representative Don Beyer (D–VA). Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Helium has unique properties that make it irreplaceable for some applications. For example, helium is the only element that won’t freeze, making liquid helium indispensable for reaching temperatures near absolute zero. That’s key for cooling the magnets of MRI machines and for myriad types of physics research. Starting in the 1960s, the United States accumulated a vast reserve of crude helium—a byproduct of natural gas drilling—storing 1 trillion liters of gas underground in a natural geological formation near Amarillo, Texas. However, in 1996, Congress passed the Helium Privatization Act, which ordered BLM to sell the helium reserve.Those sales proved problematic. The 1996 law instructed BLM to sell the helium at a constant rate and at a price that would recoup the $1.3 billion that the government had spent accumulating it. But that approach was holding down the market price of helium and encouraging waste, concluded a 2010 report from the National Academies’ National Research Council. What’s more, BLM had a mandate to continue the sales only until it had recouped the government’s investment. That would have occurred in September 2013, with roughly 370 billion liters still in the ground.So Congress passed the 2013 act, and last year 10% of BLM’s helium sales were through auction. But the change didn’t broaden the market as hoped.More than a dozen companies sell refined helium. But only four of them have refineries connected to the federal helium reserve. So nonrefiners who buy federal helium must work out a “tolling” deal to get one of the refiners to process it. In the past, BLM had reserved 10% of helium for fixed-price “non-allocated” sales to nonrefiners, four of whom bought helium in 2013. But with that helium now on sale to the highest bidder, two of the refiners bought it all, shutting out the nine nonrefiners at the auction.Refiners were apparently willing to pay a premium to block entry by the nonrefining companies. At auction, the winning bidders paid an average of $5.69 per kiloliter of gas, 52% more than the fixed price for the 90% of the helium that BLM sold to refiners in so-called allocated sales, Anne-Marie Fennell of the Government Accounting Office testified.Whether such a tactic is fair depends on whom you ask. Refiners essentially gamed the system, said David Joyner, president of Air Liquide Helium America Inc. of Houston, Texas, which doesn’t do its own refining. “The auction was set up to fail from the start,” he said. In particular, he said, nonrefiners were effectively discouraged from bidding because BLM has not enforced provisions of the law requiring refiners to set a reasonable price. Joyner wants BLM to maintain the sales for nonrefiners in addition to the auction sales, which Lamborn says is what the law intended.The general manager for global helium at Air Products & Chemicals Inc. in Allentown, Pennsylvania—which bought 78% of the auctioned helium—sees it differently. “The auction last year did exactly what the [2013] act intend, obtain a market price for helium,” said Walter Nelson, whose company also refines helium. Nelson said that if nonrefiners don’t like the price set by refiners they should simply invest in their own refineries. However, experts say that’s unlikely to happen, given that the reserve is likely to close in 6 years.Its closure will likely make a bad situation worse for scientists, says William Halperin, a physicist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Researchers are already being battered by price volatility, he testified. For example, Halperin told ScienceInsider that he pays about $6.50 per liter of liquid helium, whereas some of his colleagues have to pay as much at $40 per liter of liquid helium. Halperin told the committee that he would like to know why the range is so great. Such volatility, he said, is likely to get worse when the federal reserve in Amarillo, Texas, closes: It is the only place in the world where helium can be stockpiled to provide a buffer against supply fluctuations. “This subcommittee should consider possible legislative fixes to keep the helium reserve open beyond 2021,” he testified at the hearing.The next BLM auction is planned for 18 August. According to the law, that auction should account for 20% of BLM sales in 2015.last_img read more

Yellow fever threat is serious but not an emergency WHO says

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email After weeks of growing alarm about the ongoing urban outbreaks of yellow fever in Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, an emergency committee convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) lowered the pitch a little today. It called the outbreak “a serious public health event,” but because the international spread of the disease has slowed and vaccine supplies are recovering, the committee stopped short of declaring it a “public health emergency of international concern” (PHEIC). That label would have given any recommendations from WHO greater power. (The organization has declared a PHEIC four times: for H1N1 influenza, the resurgence of polio, the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, and most recently the Zika virus.)“I think it was the correct decision,” says Duane Gubler, an infectious disease specialist who recently retired from Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore. “However, the threat is there and needs to be recognized, not ignored like we usually do.” Yellow fever is caused by a virus spread by Aedes aegypti, the same mosquito that spreads Zika. Isolated human cases usually occur in or close to the jungle, where monkeys are a reservoir of the pathogen. When the virus gets into the mosquito population of a major city, however, it can cause devastating outbreaks. This happened in December of last year in Luanda, the capital of Angola and home to at least 8 million people. In the country as a whole, 2267 suspected cases of yellow fever have been reported, with at least 293 deaths.center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe “Urban yellow fever is a particularly dangerous and concerning situation because of the possibility of rapid spread,” Bruce Aylward, head of the Outbreaks and Health Emergencies Cluster at WHO, said at a press conference in Geneva, Switzerland, today. Indeed, the outbreak appears to have spread to Kinshasa, another African capital with millions of inhabitants. And travelers infected in Angola have also been reported in Kenya and China.The chair of the WHO emergency committee, Nigerian virologist Oyewale Tomori, said that the affected countries need to make absolutely sure that visitors are vaccinated against the virus. He added that surveillance needs to be intensified, mass vaccinations organized, and risk communication improved.But the crisis has eased a bit. Although an emergency stockpile of 6 million doses of yellow fever vaccine was used up earlier this year in combatting the Angolan outbreak, production is replenishing it, Aylward said. “Currently we expect that by the end of May the stockpile will be about 7 million doses.” Several million more doses should become available in the coming months.Even if the vaccine runs low again, some scientists have argued that current doses could be split to vaccinate two or even five people instead of one each. It is unclear how long protection would persist or even by which factor to divide doses. “Right now there are gaps in the scientific knowledge,” Aylward acknowledged. But Jack Woodall, a retired virologist in London who worked at the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention and WHO, thinks lower doses should be used immediately. “They are always talking about the future and in the meantime the vaccine is getting used up,” he says. “As long as this outbreak drags on, the risk is high.”last_img read more

Video Assassin bugs ambush spiders in their own webs

first_imgAssassin bugs are just as cunning as they sound. The patient hunters stalk their dinners, ambushing unaware aphids and caterpillars before killing them with their beaks—piercing, sucking mouthparts they use to slurp up their target’s insides. But when they turn to another type of prey, a web-weaving spider, they face another challenge: sneaking up on the eight-legged morsels in their own webs. That’s an impressive feat because many spiders use their webs as extensions of their sensory systems. Now, scientists have figured out just how the assassin bugs stay under the radar. The gangly insects slowly grasp strands of web with their foretarsi—the tips of their front legs—and carefully pull them away from each other until they break, as shown in the video above. They then gently release the ends to minimize any telltale vibrations. By doing this, they can slice their way through the web, completely undetected, in a direct path to their prey. To measure the vibrations caused by this maneuver without touching the web, scientists used laser vibrometry, as they report today in Royal Society Open Science. Their measurements showed that the assassin bugs’ vibrations were virtually undetectable—revealing how these insects earned their name.last_img read more

Blood test could predict recovery time after concussions

first_imgGill, with concussion physician Jeffrey Bazarian of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in New York, and colleagues took preseason blood samples from more than 600 male and female University of Rochester athletes who participate in contact sports: football, basketball, hockey, and lacrosse. In it, they measured levels of tau, a protein linked to traumatic brain injury and Alzheimer’s disease, which has been found to be elevated in the blood of Olympic boxers and concussed ice hockey players. Then, in the 46 collegiate players who sustained concussions during the season, the researchers measured tau in the blood again—as they did in 37 uninjured, control athletes—at multiple time points: within 6 hours of the injury, and 1, 3, and 7 days later. (The concussions were witnessed by on-field, certified athletic trainers. The players’ symptoms also met the definition of concussion in a widely used test that evaluates symptoms like memory and balance.) Twenty-one nonathlete controls also had additional blood drawn and measured for tau, before the season.Tau is so scarce in blood that it is notoriously difficult to measure. “It’s like looking for a couple grains of sand in an Olympic size swimming pool,” Gill says. So the researchers turned to a machine made by Quanterix of Lexington, Massachusetts, that uses magnetic beads coated by an antibody that binds selectively and extremely tightly to the protein in the blood.As a group, the roughly 61% of the concussed athletes who weren’t cleared to return to play for more than 10 days had significantly higher concentrations of tau in their blood at 6, 24, and 72 hours after their injuries than did the players that experts said could return to the field sooner, the team reports today in Neurology. The biggest difference between the two groups was in the bloods taken within 6 hours of the athletes’ injuries.Counterintuitively, in the group of athletes who were cleared to return to play sooner, the average tau level in the blood drawn within 6 hours after injury was actually lower than it was in the baseline, preseason blood draw. Possibly, this is because tau levels are known to rise, independent of injury, with exertion; thus the fall in tau from the preseason level may have reflected the players’ immediate, enforced rest after their injuries.The nonathlete controls had lower levels of tau in their blood than the athletes at baseline, supporting the idea that exercise may lead to naturally higher tau blood levels. Why that may be is unclear, although the blood-brain barrier is thought to become more permeable during exertion; whatever the reason, the finding in the nonathletes will have to be accounted for if a blood test for tau as a measure of concussion severity is to become a reality.The tau measure was also far from infallible. Blood tau levels within 6 hours after injury predicted with only 81% accuracy whether a given player would return to play in 10 days or less. What’s more, tau in the blood is only a proxy for tau in the brain, notes Barry Kosofsky, who directs the pediatric concussion clinic at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City.“The bottom line is they are measuring something in the blood that they hope is reflective of injury to the brain, but the signal may be obscured because it’s an indirect measure,” he says. He nonetheless calls the work “critically important” and says that an objective biomarker would be a “godsend” in his daily practice.One avenue that needs exploring soon, says Gill, is whether other protein markers in the blood rise after concussions. Discovering those, she says, might fill out the picture, bringing that 81% to 100%. Email In athletes who suffered a concussion, a protein in their blood may be able to predict when they can return to action. A new study finds that those who took longer to return to play had higher levels of a protein known as tau in their blood in the 6 hours following the trauma than players who were cleared to return to the field sooner. Tau blood testing isn’t ready for prime time, but experts say that if it pans out it would become an invaluable tool for coaches and physicians alike.Trainers, sports physicians, and neurologists deal with some 3.8 million sports-related concussions in the United States each year. But they still lack an objective medical test to establish whether someone has sustained the injury, and at what point they have recovered enough from one to resume playing. Instead, they are forced to rely on often-nebulous physical signs, and on players’ self-reporting of symptoms. And it’s known that players, keen to get back on the field, often minimize these.“We don’t want a biomarker that just says somebody had a concussion,” says study leader Jessica Gill, a neuroscientist at the National Institute of Nursing Research in Bethesda, Maryland. “We want a biomarker that says who needs to be out of play to recover.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

March for Science responses split down party lines says new Pew survey

first_imgA new survey reveals Americans’ conflicted opinions about the March for Science Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) From New Zealand to Mexico City, Science covered the March for Science as it happened. Overall, responses were split down major party lines. Sixty-eight percent of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents supported the goals of the march, compared with just 25% of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents. And though 61% of Democrats expect the marches to lead to greater public support for science, 60% of Republicans expect they’ll make no difference.When it came to hurting public support for science, 7% of all respondents agreed the march was damaging, compared with 44% who said it would help public support and 44% who said it would make no difference. Among Americans between ages 18 and 29, the majority said the march would help raise support for government funding of science and encourage scientists to be more active in civic affairs. Live updates from the global March for Science Bill Douthitt/Science By Lindzi WesselMay. 12, 2017 , 6:00 PM Email News flash: Citizens of the United States are divided over politics. And that divisive spirit was not shaken by the tens of thousands of people who participated in last month’s March for Science, according to a new Pew research poll. The survey—of about 1000 U.S. adults several weeks after the march—found that 48% supported its goals, 26% opposed them, and 26% “don’t know” their position. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country March for Science responses split down party lines, says new Pew survey The Pew Poll isn’t the last word on the march, however: Many social scientists in the United States braved the rain in Washington, D.C., and across the country to collect information on marcher party affiliations and motivations. But so far, preliminary data from those researchers are consistent with the Pew results.last_img read more

Listen to this killer whale say hello and byebye

first_img By Katie LanginJan. 30, 2018 , 7:01 PM Listen to this killer whale say ‘hello’ and ‘bye-bye’ When it comes to echoing human speech, parrots are the superstars of the animal world—but a killer whale named Wikie may not be far behind. The 14-year-old orca showed off her vocal skills by imitating her trainer’s words, saying things like “Amy” and “bye-bye.” Researchers got her to do this by first training her to obey a hand signal that meant “copy this,” which, for instance, was used to instruct her to copy another orca squirting water into the air. Then, they presented her with sounds she had never heard before—five sounds from other orcas and six phrases spoken by trainers—and asked her to repeat them. In all trials, Wikie responded to the command by uttering something that roughly matched the sound that she was asked to copy, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Sometimes it took as many as 17 tries to get it right, but she got four of them on her first try, including the human phrases “hello” and “one, two, three.” Orcas form tight-knit groups in the wild, each with their own dialect, so scientists think that their ability to learn new sounds may be key to how they communicate and interact with one other.last_img read more